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Old February 6th, 2020 #101
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Vasily Kalinnikov -





The Cedar and the Palm, symphonic picture after Heinrich Heine's poem (1898)


Heinrich Heine: The Pine and the Palm (From German)

There stands a pine tree- lonesome
In the north on a barren height
In slumber. Ice and snowstorm
Wrap it in sheets of white.

It dreams about a palmtree
Far in the east, alone,
Staring, in sorrow and silence,
At a blazing wall of stone.

Translated by A.Z. Foreman - http://poemsintranslation.blogspot.c...palm-from.html









Serenade for String Orchestra (1891)









Bylina, overture (1892)

"A bylina (Russian: были́на) is a traditional East Slavic oral epic poem. Byliny songs are loosely based on historical fact, but greatly embellished with fantasy or hyperbole to create their songs. The word bylina is derived from the past tense of the verb "to be" (Russian: быть) and implies "something that was."

The text was taken from Wikipedia.



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Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old June 14th, 2020 #102
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Honestly, I do not know what to do with this topic.

90% of what I represented here became inactive links.

What was it?

Youtube action against Russian classical music?

I don't know.

I know that in a short period of time, many links to Russian classical music (including on personal channels) ceased to exist.
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Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old July 21st, 2020 #103
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Alexey Rybnikov - "The Northern Sphinx", Concerto Grosso for violin, cello, guitar, piano, and chamber orchestra (2006) - PART I


[It dedicated to the personality of the Russian Emperor — Alexander I.]





Рождество В Царском Селе [Alexander I spent his childhood in Tsarskoe Selo.]





Михаловский замок [Here the conspirators (Alexander I knew about the conspiracy) killed the father of Alexander I, Emperor Paul I.]





Воспоминания





Наводнение [Most likely referring to the flood of 1824 in St. Petersburg.]

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Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old July 21st, 2020 #104
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Alexey Rybnikov - "The Northern Sphinx", Concerto Grosso for violin, cello, guitar, piano, and chamber orchestra (2006) - PART II





Смерть Софи [Most likely referring to Sophia Naryshkina (1805-1824) who seems to be the illegitimate daughter of Alexander I. It really could be a tragedy for Alexander I because his legitimate children died in infancy. Maria (1799-1800). Elizabeth (1806-1808)]





Пастораль





Заговор [This refers to the conspiracy of the Decembrists about which Alexander I knew, but which led to an uprising already during the ascension of his successor Nicholas I.]





Таганрог [Alexander I died in the city of Taganrog.]

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Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old 1 Week Ago #105
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Dmitry Kabalevsky - Piano Concerto #4 "Prague Concerto", Op. 99 - (1975)





"Dmitry Kabalevsky (1904–1987) was a Soviet composer and teacher of Russian gentry descent.

He helped set up the Union of Soviet Composers in Moscow and remained one of its leading figures during his lifetime. He was a prolific composer of piano music and chamber music; many of his piano works were performed by Vladimir Horowitz. He is best known in Western Europe for his Second Symphony, the "Comedians' Galop" from The Comedians Suite, Op. 26 and his Third Piano Concerto.

Kabalevsky was born in Saint Petersburg in 1904, but moved to Moscow at a young age. His father was a mathematician and encouraged him to study mathematics, but he showed a fascination for the arts from a young age. He studied at the Academic Music College in Moscow and graduated in 1925. He then went on to study at the Moscow Conservatory where he learned composition with Nikolai Myaskovsky and piano with Alexander Goldenweiser. By the age of 26 his list of compositions included the String Quartet, Op. 8, Piano Concerto, Op. 9, Eight Children's Songs, Op. 17, and various works for solo piano. In 1932 he was appointed senior lecturer at the Moscow Conservatory and by 1939 was a full-time professor. He also worked as a music critic for the All-Union Radio and as an editor for the Sovetskaya muzïka and the publisher Muzgiz.

Kabalevsky was a prolific composer in many ways; he wrote symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber works, songs, theatre, film scores, pieces for children and some pieces for the proletariat. During the 1930s he wrote music for the emerging genre of films with sound, some of his music became recognized in its own right. However, his biggest contribution to the world of music-making was his consistent effort to connect children to music. During 1925–1926 he worked as a piano teacher in a government school and was struck by the lack of proper material for children to learn music. He set out to write easy pieces that would allow children to conquer technical difficulties and at the same time begin to form their taste. His music focused on bridging the gap between children's technical skills and adult aesthetics. He also wrote a book on the subject, which was published in the United States in 1988 as Music and Education: A Composer Writes about Musical Education.

He joined the Communist Party in 1940 and received the Medal of Honour from the Soviet government for his musical skill in 1941.

Kabalevsky wrote for all musical genres and was consistently faithful to the ideals of socialist realism. Kabalevsky frequently travelled overseas; he was a member of the Soviet Committee for the Defense of Peace as well as a representative for the Promotion of Friendship between the Soviet Union and foreign countries.

He was awarded a number of state honours for his musical works, including those given by the Soviet government. In regards to his teaching, he was elected the head of the Commission of Musical Aesthetic Education of Children in 1962, and was also elected president of the Scientific Council of Educational Aesthetics in the Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of the USSR in 1969. Kabalevsky also received the honorary degree of the president of the International Society of Musical Education."


The text was taken from Wikipedia.














__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old 1 Week Ago #106
steven clark
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Default Russian classical music

I enjoyed reading the post on Kabelevsky. In America we mostly know his work The Comedians, especially the gallop. When I was a chid, you heard it everywhere, as you did the Sword dance from the ballet Spartacus.
On our classical music station here, you can catch the Comedians being played all the time.

Interesting how a composer's serious work is lost, while the light stuff endures.
I remember Tchaikovsy agonized over critical opinion of his work; he should of just told them to get lost, like Beethoven did, but Tchaikovsy had problems, I believe.

I can take or leave modern Russian music; Prokofiev is good (a French girl I knew took to me to his ballet of Cinderella), and she was quite fond of Russia.
I can take or leave Stravinsky; sometimes he annoys me, and Shostakovich seems noisy.

I do remember decades ago, I went to a college in Indiana, where they had a great opera department, and performed Prince Igor by Borodin, and it was breathtaking; beautiful, well sung, and one of the most beautiful performances I've ever seen.

Getting off-topic, I also have a very good recording of Russian military marches; really stirring stuff like the Preobazhenski march, Izmailovsky Regiment, 'Heroic' march, and 'Totleben.' Gives the German marches a run for their money.
On an old recording of the Red Army Chorus is a triumphant song composed for Stalingrad. Really rousing; great song to start off the morning.
 
Old 1 Week Ago #107
Ray Allan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Him View Post
Honestly, I do not know what to do with this topic.

90% of what I represented here became inactive links.

What was it?

Youtube action against Russian classical music?

I don't know.

I know that in a short period of time, many links to Russian classical music (including on personal channels) ceased to exist.
As you probably know, JewTube is wiping clean all pro-White material from their site and that includes classical music. And to them, anything Russian is a special kind of evil.
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--Henry A. Kissinger, jewish politician and advisor
 
Old 1 Week Ago #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steven clark View Post
I enjoyed reading the post on Kabelevsky. In America we mostly know his work The Comedians, especially the gallop. When I was a chid, you heard it everywhere, as you did the Sword dance from the ballet Spartacus.
On our classical music station here, you can catch the Comedians being played all the time.
I have known for a long time that such a composer existed, but I am practically not familiar with his works.



Quote:
Interesting how a composer's serious work is lost, while the light stuff endures.
I am lazy and therefore also inclined towards light and playful music

For example, from the works of Camille Saint-Saens, I only know The Carnival of the Animals.



Quote:
I remember Tchaikovsy agonized over critical opinion of his work; he should of just told them to get lost, like Beethoven did, but Tchaikovsy had problems, I believe.
Have you read any of his letters or memoirs?



Quote:
I can take or leave modern Russian music; Prokofiev is good (a French girl I knew took to me to his ballet of Cinderella), and she was quite fond of Russia.
I can take or leave Stravinsky; sometimes he annoys me, and Shostakovich seems noisy.
If you like Prokofiev so much, then you will get his now

I don’t remember if I wrote here that my favorite composer is Mussorgsky.



Quote:
I do remember decades ago, I went to a college in Indiana, where they had a great opera department, and performed Prince Igor by Borodin, and it was breathtaking; beautiful, well sung, and one of the most beautiful performances I've ever seen.
I'm glad you liked this opera.

I haven't listened to the opera yet.



Quote:
Getting off-topic, I also have a very good recording of Russian military marches; really stirring stuff like the Preobazhenski march, Izmailovsky Regiment, 'Heroic' march, and 'Totleben.' Gives the German marches a run for their money.
On an old recording of the Red Army Chorus is a triumphant song composed for Stalingrad. Really rousing; great song to start off the morning.
I agree with you, and I like many of the Russian marches that I have seen recently (they have no military threat to anyone, but they have lyricism and dignity).






Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
As you probably know, JewTube is wiping clean all pro-White material from their site and that includes classical music. And to them, anything Russian is a special kind of evil.
Now it is clear to me why this happened.

The personal account I wrote about that it disappeared is now back.

As for the music auto-generated by YouTube, then:

"On June 1, 2020, we discontinued most auto-generated topic channels because they weren't often used. This means you'll no longer see auto-generated channels with "Topic" in the channel name, such as "Surfing - Topic" or "Cats - Topic."

If you were subscribed to these topic channels, you’ll no longer see them in your subscriptions list. Since videos from auto-generated topic channels did not show in subscription feeds, this change will not impact the videos in your subscriptions feed.

(Game channels and artist channels that are auto-generated are still available. Also, you can still choose topics on Home and Watch Next to see suggested videos on topics you’re interested in. Popular topics like Music and News have destination pages you can get to from the Explore tab.)" - https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/2579942?hl=en


Thus, users could not appreciate all the benefits of the new YouTube feature.






Sergei Prokofiev - Symphony #7 in C-sharp minor, Opus 131 - (1952)





Music start at 02:00.



__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old 6 Days Ago #109
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Reinhold Glière -





Solemn Overture for the 20th Anniversary of the October Revolution, Op. 72 - (1937)

(Bolshoi Theater Orchestra. Conducted by Evgeny Svetlanov.)









Concert Waltz in D-flat major for orchestra, Op. 90 - (1950)

(BBC Philharmonic. Conducted by Vasily Sinalsky.)









Heroic March for the Buryat-Mongolian ASSR, Op. 71 - (1936)

[ASSR - Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic]

(BBC Philharmonic. Conducted by Vasily Sinalsky.)



__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old 3 Days Ago #110
steven clark
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Default Russian Classical music

I always liked Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. Usually we hear the orchestrated version, but in Boston a pianist played the original score, and it was quite good.

I always liked Saint-Saens septet for trumpet. I'm fond of trumpet concertos, and it's pretty bouncy.

When I was in Boston, I went to a performance of the Russian Folklore ballet, and they did a ballet of Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain. They had been picketed by Jews, who were angry enough weren't being let out of the USSR, and threatened people outside 'blood will be on your hands if you attend this.'

They had thrown a smoke bomb in the theater the night before I went.

The company concluded with an American ballet, with them dressed up as cowboys and farmers, doing Turkey in the Straw. It was kind of fun.
 
Old 3 Days Ago #111
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Default Russian Classical music

A piece I really love that is not serious classical is the march from Rimsky-Khorsakov's Mlada. It always is fun to listen to, and is melodic but also not challenging. It would make a great march for Putin, but I'm sure he's probably used it.
 
Old 2 Days Ago #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steven clark View Post
I always liked Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. Usually we hear the orchestrated version, but in Boston a pianist played the original score, and it was quite good.
No.

I mainly had in mind his operas "Boris Godunov", "Khovanshchina" and "The Fair at Sorochyntsi".



Quote:
I always liked Saint-Saens septet for trumpet. I'm fond of trumpet concertos, and it's pretty bouncy.
This septet I have not heard.

Have you heard this Mozart thing? - https://vnnforum.com/showpost.php?p=...postcount=6026



Quote:
When I was in Boston, I went to a performance of the Russian Folklore ballet, and they did a ballet of Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain. They had been picketed by Jews, who were angry enough weren't being let out of the USSR, and threatened people outside 'blood will be on your hands if you attend this.'

They had thrown a smoke bomb in the theater the night before I went.
As far as I know, Mussorgsky did not create a single ballet. So I don't know what you watched.

Well, now all Jews are where they want to be.



Quote:
The company concluded with an American ballet, with them dressed up as cowboys and farmers, doing Turkey in the Straw. It was kind of fun.
I don't understand who "doing Turkey in the Straw"? The Russian Folklore ballet or some American ballet?



Quote:
A piece I really love that is not serious classical is the march from Rimsky-Khorsakov's Mlada. It always is fun to listen to, and is melodic but also not challenging. It would make a great march for Putin, but I'm sure he's probably used it.
Do you mean this thing?








I think if Putin needs music he will easily find it among the many works of Russian classical music.
__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old 2 Days Ago #113
steven clark
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Default Russian Classical music

Alex:
Mozart: I know all his four horn concertos.
Night on Bald Mountain: it was choreographed for the Russian Folklore Ballet, and, yes, they danced the Turkey in the Straw.

Yes, that is the piece from Mlada; actually titled The Procession of the Nobles.

It's always an interesting (although to you it must be tiresome) argument as to how 'civilized' the Russians really are. I think they are a very cultured people, and although despotic, have much humanity, but one can say much the same about Americans. I think Hitler considering Russians savage was very stupid.
More than one historian said if the Germans had come as true liberators, most of the communist regime would have collapsed. Ernst Zundel, who you know was arrested for denying the Holocaust, visited Russia and enjoyed Russians very much, and thought it a great shame Germany and Russia went to war. Many Russians he spoke to said there must have been some secret reason Hitler went to war with Stalin. I'd add that especially since Prussia (Germany) and Russia were allies in the 19th century.

Winston Churchill said the decisive event of the 20th century was that the Americans spoke English (so they could bail Britain out of WWI/WWII). The Hungarian historian John Lukacs said the decisive event of the 21st century may well be that the Russians are white.

I didn't mean to move away from Russian music, but I think Russia is a very rich and diverse country, and we shouldn't be enemies.

I feel your music and literature is deep and genuine; much of ours in America has been taken over by the Jews, much like Poland seemed to have let the Jews take over much of their economy and government. Sometimes we Americans seem like new world Poles, if that means anything to you.
 
Old 1 Day Ago #114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steven clark View Post
Alex:
Mozart: I know all his four horn concertos.
On my CD-disk there was only this concert, so I only know this thing



Quote:
Night on Bald Mountain: it was choreographed for the Russian Folklore Ballet, and, yes, they danced the Turkey in the Straw.

Yes, that is the piece from Mlada; actually titled The Procession of the Nobles.
Then I have no doubt that the Russian ballet dressed as cowboys was a very funny show



Quote:
It's always an interesting (although to you it must be tiresome) argument as to how 'civilized' the Russians really are. I think they are a very cultured people, and although despotic, have much humanity, but one can say much the same about Americans.
It seemed to me that you are using the terms "civilized" and "cultural" as synonyms. Although these phenomena often accompany each other and feed each other, I believe that they are still different phenomena.

I don't understand what you see as the despotism of the Russians and the Americans



Quote:
I think Hitler considering Russians savage was very stupid.
I have not read Hitler's works and therefore I will not venture to assess the degree of his intelligence.

But in my opinion, he was in captivity of some illusions about the USSR and the Russian people.



Quote:
More than one historian said if the Germans had come as true liberators, most of the communist regime would have collapsed.
I will not dare to assert that the communist regime would have irrevocably collapsed in this case, but I have no doubt that it would be easier for the Germans to wage war if they had not turned against themselves the absolute majority of the population of the USSR with their actions dictated by their ideology. (Soviet Nationalities in German Wartime Strategy, 1941-1945)



Quote:
Ernst Zundel, who you know was arrested for denying the Holocaust, visited Russia and enjoyed Russians very much, and thought it a great shame Germany and Russia went to war. Many Russians he spoke to said there must have been some secret reason Hitler went to war with Stalin. I'd add that especially since Prussia (Germany) and Russia were allies in the 19th century.
I don't know what you see so mysterious in the desire to seize the resources and territories of other peoples.

Why there must be some additional "secret reason" here?



Quote:
Winston Churchill said the decisive event of the 20th century was that the Americans spoke English (so they could bail Britain out of WWI/WWII). The Hungarian historian John Lukacs said the decisive event of the 21st century may well be that the Russians are white.
I am unable to appreciate the plausibility of these words of Churchill. I don't understand the reasons why one English-speaking country cannot enter into an alliance with a non-English-speaking country against another English-speaking country if it is beneficial for it.

And I don't know what bright prospects John Lukacs is counting on with such a policy of the West towards Russia.



Quote:
I didn't mean to move away from Russian music, but I think Russia is a very rich and diverse country, and we shouldn't be enemies.
I also believe that we should not be enemies.




Quote:
I feel your music and literature is deep and genuine;
Thank you for such a compliment to Russian art!



Quote:
much of ours in America has been taken over by the Jews, much like Poland seemed to have let the Jews take over much of their economy and government. Sometimes we Americans seem like new world Poles, if that means anything to you.
It seems that the Americans have a special attitude to the Poles?






Alexander Glazunov - From the Middle Ages, suite for orchestra in E major, Op. 79 - (1902)

















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