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Old December 12th, 2006 #1
James Hawthorne
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Football fan shot dead after racist mob attack



A French football fan was shot dead by a police officer after a mob of young white men, screaming anti-Semitic and racist insults, attacked a Hapoel Tel Aviv supporter outside the Parc des Princes in Paris late on Thursday night.

The plain clothes police officer, aged 32, was under arrest yesterday after shooting dead a 25-year-old man after a Uefa Cup game between Paris Saint Germain and Hapoel Tel Aviv.

Police and eye-witnesses said a mob of up to 300 white men chased a French Tel Aviv supporter after the game shouting "dirty Jew" and "fat Jew", making Nazi salutes and screaming "Le Pen president".

The black transport policeman, on duty to protect buses, intervened to rescue the Tel Aviv fan. The mob of Paris fans then turned on him, shouting "dirty black", "France for the French" and making monkey noises. After being knocked to the ground and beaten, the policeman drew his gun and fired, killing one man and seriously injuring another.

The Interior Minister, Nicolas Sarkozy, said yesterday that the incident was a "tragedy". "This was football, not war," he said. "It's unthinkable that a football match should end in this way. Twenty-five is not an age to die. You can't have the fans of one club running after another, shouting 'dirty Jew'."

Paris Saint Germain, who lost the match 4-2, have a record of racial violence among fans, including involvement in brawls between groups of supporters with white, north African, black or anti-racist allegiances. The mob who chased the Tel Aviv fan was said to be part of a white supremacist, skinhead group called the Boulogne Boys. There were calls yesterday for action to break up such groups of supporters. "The seriousness of this event confirms the absolute necessity of fighting racism and anti-Semitism among Paris Saint German fans," said the Mayor of the city, Bertrand Delanoe.

Police officers said that the policeman had stepped in front of the fleeing Tel Aviv fan and offered to protect him. He was not wearing a uniform or a police armband but he warned the mob that he was a police officer. He was insulted and knocked to the ground and drew a tear-gas canister first and then his gun and fired two shots. He will now be questioned by a police unit which investigates alleged police crimes and may face charges.

Police unions suggested yesterday that he was a hero, rather than a villain. "Should he have allowed himself to be lynched?" said Joaquin Masanet of the Unsa police union. "Let's not forget that he had the courage to come to the help of an Israeli fan."

The Tel Aviv fan, who later came forward to offer his evidence to police, was a Jewish French citizen. A journalist who witnessed the incident, Philippe Broussard of L'Express, said he heard the policeman shout to the Tel Aviv fan: "Stay behind me. Stay behind me."

* An opinion poll yesterday found that 17 per cent of French people were ready to vote for Jean-Marie Le Pen, the leader of the far-right National Front in presidential elections next year.

A French football fan was shot dead by a police officer after a mob of young white men, screaming anti-Semitic and racist insults, attacked a Hapoel Tel Aviv supporter outside the Parc des Princes in Paris late on Thursday night.

The plain clothes police officer, aged 32, was under arrest yesterday after shooting dead a 25-year-old man after a Uefa Cup game between Paris Saint Germain and Hapoel Tel Aviv.

Police and eye-witnesses said a mob of up to 300 white men chased a French Tel Aviv supporter after the game shouting "dirty Jew" and "fat Jew", making Nazi salutes and screaming "Le Pen president".

The black transport policeman, on duty to protect buses, intervened to rescue the Tel Aviv fan. The mob of Paris fans then turned on him, shouting "dirty black", "France for the French" and making monkey noises. After being knocked to the ground and beaten, the policeman drew his gun and fired, killing one man and seriously injuring another.

The Interior Minister, Nicolas Sarkozy, said yesterday that the incident was a "tragedy". "This was football, not war," he said. "It's unthinkable that a football match should end in this way. Twenty-five is not an age to die. You can't have the fans of one club running after another, shouting 'dirty Jew'."

Paris Saint Germain, who lost the match 4-2, have a record of racial violence among fans, including involvement in brawls between groups of supporters with white, north African, black or anti-racist allegiances. The mob who chased the Tel Aviv fan was said to be part of a white supremacist, skinhead group called the Boulogne Boys. There were calls yesterday for action to break up such groups of supporters. "The seriousness of this event confirms the absolute necessity of fighting racism and anti-Semitism among Paris Saint German fans," said the Mayor of the city, Bertrand Delanoe.
Police officers said that the policeman had stepped in front of the fleeing Tel Aviv fan and offered to protect him. He was not wearing a uniform or a police armband but he warned the mob that he was a police officer. He was insulted and knocked to the ground and drew a tear-gas canister first and then his gun and fired two shots. He will now be questioned by a police unit which investigates alleged police crimes and may face charges.

Police unions suggested yesterday that he was a hero, rather than a villain. "Should he have allowed himself to be lynched?" said Joaquin Masanet of the Unsa police union. "Let's not forget that he had the courage to come to the help of an Israeli fan."

The Tel Aviv fan, who later came forward to offer his evidence to police, was a Jewish French citizen. A journalist who witnessed the incident, Philippe Broussard of L'Express, said he heard the policeman shout to the Tel Aviv fan: "Stay behind me. Stay behind me."

* An opinion poll yesterday found that 17 per cent of French people were ready to vote for Jean-Marie Le Pen, the leader of the far-right National Front in presidential elections next year.

Independent


Spanish Fascist Rally Marked By Homophobia



Hundreds of fascist supporters, many making stiff-armed salutes and chanting insults against gays and immigrants, gathered Sunday to mark the 31st anniversary of the death of Spanish dictator Gen. Francisco Franco.
The crowd, mostly retirees, waved red-and-yellow Spanish flags with the insignia of the Franco regime's Falange party at the annual rally in Plaza de Oriente.

The square was where Franco, who died in 1975 at the age of 82, used to regularly address hundreds of thousands of supporters at rallies during his nearly 40 years in power.

Since his death, dwindling numbers of nostalgic supporters commemorate his death on the Sunday closest to Nov. 20. Police gave no official estimate for the attendance Sunday but witnesses estimated fewer than 1,000 people participated.

During the meeting, attendants heard speeches criticizing the policies of Socialist Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero - among them the legalization of same-sex marriage - and against the influx of immigrants into Spain in recent years.

On Saturday, some 4,000 Franco supporters gathered at the Valle de los Caidos mausoleum outside the capital where the dictator and Falange founder, Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, are buried.

Both events are largely ignored by Spain's mainstream political parties and given scant coverage by national media.

LOGO

Jean-Marie Le Pen is sure discontented French hear his message





While France's other presidential candidates are busy vying for airtime and holding campaign rallies, Jean-Marie Le Pen is heading off to the Caribbean for a two-week vacation.

The veteran leader of the far-right National Front is in good spirits. Five months ahead of presidential elections, opinion polls show him with almost twice the support he had ahead of the 2002 ballot, when he stunned France by coming in second.

Le Pen says he is not worried about temporarily vanishing to the beach. For months he has watched his ratings climb as media attention stayed firmly focused on the two main contenders: Ségolène Royal on the left and Nicolas Sarkozy on the right.

Some commentators have compared him to a crocodile, lurking dangerously under water. He prefers another image.

Unlike Zorro, Le Pen is 78 years old and a little hard of hearing. This will be his sixth presidential run, though he still has to gather the 500 signatures from elected officials needed for a place on the ballot.

But his fiercely nationalistic message, peppered with anti-immigration slogans and references to sleaze in the governing elite, still resonates with a French electorate that is fearful of globalization and ever more disillusioned with the country's leadership class.

The man who once dismissed the Nazi gas chambers as a "detail" of history now has the backing of 17 percent of French voters, according to a CSA poll published in Le Monde last week. In November 2001, a similar CSA poll predicted that he would get 9 percent of the vote.

He ended up winning 16.86 percent in the first round in 2002, beating the Socialist candidate, Lionel Jospin, and sailing into a runoff against President Jacques Chirac.

Now some of his supporters forecast that his score may climb to 25 percent on April 22 and propel him into the run- off again.

Few pollsters consider this likely. Surveys to date predict that Royal and Sarkozy will face off in the second round; analysts say that the memory of 2002 will bolster turnout for the mainstream candidates. But four years after France's leaders closed ranks behind Chirac and pledged to close the rift between the political class and the grass roots, that rift appears to be as wide as ever.

"Today, all the reasons that led to a second round with Le Pen in 2002 are still there," François Chérèque, head of the CFDT, France's biggest labor union, warned at a labor congress this month. Alain Gest, a center-right lawmaker, said that people in his constituency in northern France were no longer embarrassed to admit voting for Le Pen. Maxime Gremetz, a Communist lawmaker, complained that Le Pen "does not even have to make any noise to reap votes."

At the Villages des Fêtes, a bar in a working-class neighborhood in northeastern Paris, patrons readily admit they like Le Pen.

"We've tried the left, we've tried the right - it's all the same," said a taxi driver, who identified himself only as Sylvain. He used to vote center-right, he said, but switched in 2002. "I will vote for Le Pen again next year because he talks about issues others don't dare to talk about."

A former Socialist supporter who identified himself as Yves said that he had opted for Le Pen in the first round in 2002 to "send a message" and that next year he might do the same. "I'm fed up with politicians," he said. "They only care about themselves."

The mainstream contenders this year have sought to heed those sentiments by promising a break with the past - and addressing issues that were once taboo in their parties.

Sarkozy, 51, who serves as interior minister in Chirac's center-right administration, has aggressively courted Le Pen voters with a tough line on law- and-order and immigration.

Royal, 53, has built her popularity on a pledge to listen to voters. Following rioting by second-generation immigrant youths in housing projects across France, she surprised commentators last spring by proposing military-led community service programs for young offenders.

Le Pen proudly refers to a term that has crept into French vocabulary: the "LePen-ization" of politics. "Now my rivals talk like me," he said. "But if they think they can get my votes, they will be disappointed." And, repeating one of his favorite lines: "Voters always prefer the original to the copy."

Herald Tribune

Living with the Extremist Plague



Germany's parliament is currently debating whether to ban the far-right National Democratic Party (NPD). But such a step may prove to be neither feasible nor advisable. In fact proponents of democracy in Germany would be better off focusing on their strengths and trying to make the NPD irrelevant.

Spiegel Online

Popular Belgian Party Rejects Multicultural Society



Anti-immigrant sentiment is spreading across Europe, boosting support for populist, right-wing parties. One of the most successful is in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium. Backers of the party, known as Vlaams Belang (Flemish Interest Party) criticize Muslim immigrants for failing to assimilate.

In the Vlaams Belang's stronghold of Hoboken, on the outskirts of Antwerp, the party soared in local elections last month. It won 41 percent of the vote, far ahead of all other parties.

Sitting at the bar of a smoky cafe, school bus driver Eric Delawer says this working-class town used to vote socialist. But in recent years, with the influx of large numbers of Muslim immigrants, he says the people of Hoboken have turned to Vlaams Belang.

"The immigrants don't integrate," he says. "They separate themselves from us. They want to stay among themselves. I say, if they don't adapt to our customs, the only option is to send them back to their home countries."

In the nearby marketplace, an elderly woman, Therese Muns, says problems with immigrants and law and order are closely linked.

"We are scared," she says. "...we are afraid to go out at night. You have to watch your purse and money... When you walk down the street, they don't step aside, they don't have respect for older people, it is not like it used to be."

It's not just the indigenous Flemish population that's feeling scared.

At Koninjlik High School, where most girls wear headscarves, the student body is nearly 100 percent from immigrant backgrounds.

"I don't go anywhere," says Said Boumazoughe, 19. "I just stay here in the neighborhood..."

The student was born here of Moroccan parents. He wants to continue his studies and become a teacher, but he feels uncertain about his future.

"The reaction of the people who vote for Vlams Belang, that makes me scared because I cannot trust them," Boumazoughe says.

His social studies teacher, Sarah Van Leuvenhaege, says this school is officially called a "concentration" school. She calls Hoboken's other high school a "white" school. It has only ethnic Flemish students.

"I don't mind teaching kids from Morocco or Turkey," she says. "But I do mind that my class is not representative... of Belgian society. That is a problem. They are only hearing stories and things from their own societies."

Growing mutual suspicion and the gulf between the Flemish and immigrants' parallel societies are the pillars of Vlaams Belang's propaganda.

"We are not in favor of the famous multicultural society," says Filip Dewinter, the party's leader.

"We do not have a problem with legal immigrants if they are willing to assimilate to our culture, our way of life, our values...." he says. "But we can't allow that they come to our country, that they come to Europe, and they keep their own culture, their own religion -- Islamic religion -- which is not always compatible with our way of life, our culture."

When Dewinter speaks of culture, he means Flemish -- not Belgian. In fact, the party's other big issue is a demand for separation from the poorer, less-productive French-speaking part of Belgium, which is seen as more laissez-faire toward the influx of Muslim immigrants.

Stefaan Walgrave, a professor of political science at the University of Antwerp, says that the party's base used to be working-class, but it has now become mainstream.

Vlams Belang is also the biggest political force in Flanders. But it's stigmatized by all the other parties which have formed an unlikely coalition whose only common cause is keeping the far right out of power.

Tuur Van Wallendael, of the ruling Socialist Party, acknowledges that the establishment boycott does not prevent the pariah's message from getting through.

"We made immigration law more strict..." he says. "There are no new immigrants coming into this country legally… we simply say no."

The government has also stiffened its anti-crime policy, making it harder to get early prison release. Prisons are full, and three-quarters of inmates are of immigrant backgrounds.

The ruling coalition is also introducing measures to ensure immigrants' integration -- such as required language and civic culture courses.

This new emphasis on assimilation to Flemish society and culture infuriates Muslim activists.

Lebanese-born Dyab Abou Jahjah founded the Arab European League to defend Muslims' traditions and religious rights. He justifies Muslim immigrants resorting to violent protest when they feel oppressed.

"When you don't give them that full citizenship, then they flip as a citizen should, and they throw Molotov cocktails and they throw stones...."

NPR




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Australia First provides an alternative to the Establishment's internationalist policies, and aims to put Australia's national interests first.

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Quote:
Progress Party 32.9 (-1.0)

Labour Party 29.6 (+4.6)

Conservatives 13.5 (-1.2)

Socialist Left 6.2 (-0.4)

Christian People 5.6 (-1.6)

Agrarians 5.1 (-0.5)

Liberal Left 4.5 (+0.3)

Norway Post
Cullen under attack for quashing warrant for Israeli



The Green Party MP, Keith Locke, says the Attorney General put politics ahead of justice when he quashed an arrest warrant for a former Israeli General.

An Auckland District Court Judge issued a warrant to arrest Moshe Ya'alon, who is accused of war crimes in the Gaza Strip. He is alleged to be involved in a 2002 bombing which killed a number of civilians.

But the Attorney General, Michael Cullen, stepped in and prevented the action, saying there was not enough evidence to convict.

Mr Locke says the way Dr Cullen handled the situation was inappropriate. He says that sets a bad precedent for New Zealand upholding the rules of the international criminal court.

But Victoria University's Director of Policy Studies Dr Andrew Ladley, says there was not enough evidence to arrest Moshe Ya'alon. He says it appears Dr Cullen was acting within the law.

The New Zealand Jewish Council says the Attorney General made the right decision.
Jewish Council president Stephen Goodman says Dr Cullen's decision was reasonable and just. He says he was disappointed the New Zealand judiciary was swayed by the argument against the general.

'Political interference'
A civil libertarian says the decision smacks of political interference.

Auckland Council for Civil Liberties president Barry Wilson says the decision to issue an arrest warrant was made by an experienced judge.

He says the Attorney-General's reasons for interfering are unconvincing, and he says it is impossible to resist the conclusion there has been political interference in the case.

Mr Wilson believes the Israeli general should have been arrested and prosecuted or extradited.

Meanwhile, the Immigration Department says it would need substantiated information before any decision was made to deny General Ya'alon entry to New Zealand in the future.

RNZ

Far right wing to form political party



The far right-wing Boerestaat Party of South Africa announced on Wednesday it intends registering as a political party on December 16.

The group, which was formed in the mid-1980s, said it wanted to become a fully fledged political party because it was feeling marginalised as an extra-parliamentary group.

"We want to register first, and then we'll decide whether or not we want to take part in elections," said leader Coen Vermaak, who had in the past called on voters to boycott national elections.

The group has given notice in the Government Gazette that it is planning to register as a political party. The Independent Electoral Commission said it had not yet received an application but that the first step to register as a party was to give notice of the intention in the Government Gazette.

The Boerestaat Party was started in 1986 by Robert van Tonder and originally called for the restoration of the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek and the Orange Free State, as well as the secession of these territories from South Africa.

It has seen several controversial figures in its top ranks, including Piet "Skiet" Rudolph.

In 2002 police investigating the activities of the Boeremag raided the party's offices in Krugersdorp.

The organisation also took part in several large protests by the Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging (AWB) in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Most recently it has been noted for adopting controversial views on Aids, questioning its existence. "Condoms can only stop sperm cells and not viruses," it said about a message to use condoms to prevent HIV/Aids.

The party proclaims on its website it promotes and increases the number of the Boerevolk (Boer nation).

"The Boerestaat Party understands that the numbers [of African people] in the country is overwhelming, therefore we would focus on increasing our [white people considered Boers] numbers immediately," it states on the site.

It aims to ban abortion and any contraceptives such as the pill and other precautionary measures.

It considers condoms as evil, and anyone who wants to use them and other contraceptives cannot become a member of the party.

The party also has views on the economy, justice, agriculture and other issues.

"The party does not aim to become the government of the day, because it will never get the support of all South Africans. The party aims to increase [the numbers of] the Boer Nation, which would eventually lead to independent freedom," the party said on its site.

Mail & Guardian

Boerestaat Party

Swedish statistics show Iraqi immigrant rise



Sweden's statistics office said 7,094 Iraqis had emigrated to the Nordic state, with its traditionally liberal immigration policy, in the first three quarters of this year.

That was nearly 10 percent of the total of immigrants to Sweden in the period and more than four times the number of Iraqis that emigrated in the first nine months of 2005.

That number is likely to climb further as asylum applications from Iraq have soared in recent months.

Iraq has suffered near unrelenting violence since the U.S.-led invasion of March 2003. A group of peace activists and academics has estimated that between 47,000 and 52,000 civilians have been killed.

"There has been a rise in the number of Iraqi asylum applications," said a spokeswoman for Sweden's immigration board, which handles the initial applications.

She said that so far this year, there had been 5,988 asylum requests from Iraqis, compared with 2,330 for the whole of 2005.

In a forecast of refugee flows earlier this month, the board said that of all applications made by Iraqis to enter Europe, the United States or Australia, half were to Sweden. This made Sweden the main goal country for Iraqi asylum seekers, it said.

The spokeswoman said asylum applications had picked up since a new Swedish law came into force on March 31 that expanded the offer of asylum to those who need protection from armed conflicts, rather than just being threatened individually.

A decision on granting asylum can take on average 213 days, the spokeswoman added.

Overall, immigration fueled the largest jump in Sweden's population since 1994 in the first nine months of the year. Sweden's population grew 55,799 to 9.1 million in the period, the statistics office said.

Reuters

Race hate laws split the cabinet



The government is facing a major split over race hate laws, with cabinet colleagues divided over whether the legislation should be toughened.
Two cabinet heavyweights - the Chancellor, Gordon Brown, and the Home Secretary, John Reid - differ over how to respond to Friday's acquittal of the British National Party leader, Nick Griffin, and a fellow BNP activist.

The split comes as Brown, Reid and the Tory leader David Cameron all made moves yesterday to boost their credentials over anti-terror measures and law and order ahead of the Queen's Speech on Wednesday. The speech will include sweeping new measures to tackle antisocial behaviour, immigration, reoffending and terrorism.
Brown responded to the BNP verdict by saying Griffin's description of Islam as a 'wicked, vicious faith' would offend 'mainstream opinion in this country'. He said: 'If there is something that needs to be done to look at the law, then I think we will have to do that.'
But Home Office sources said Reid was taking a more cautious line, ruling out new legislation until well into next year. They said he wanted to see how a new race and religious hatred law - watered down by amendments in the House of Lords - 'bedded in' when it came into force in February.

The Brown-Reid divide was seen as particularly significant because the Home Secretary is being mentioned by some Blair loyalists as a potential successor to the Prime Minister.

The Chancellor's suggestion that the law might have to be tightened also prompted a strong reaction from the Liberal Democrat peer who helped lead the Lords' opposition to last year's bill.

Lord Lester, a leading human rights lawyer, said he and others would strongly oppose tougher legislation, and criticised the Attorney General, Lord Goldsmith, for bringing a prosecution against the BNP leader. 'What we need is not new laws but a more sensible attorney-general,' he said.

Goldsmith is planning a meeting tomorrow with the Crown Prosecution Service lawyers who prosecuted Griffin and the other BNP member, Mark Collett. 'He will examine whether prosecutors have sufficient powers to take the necessary action,' a spokeswoman in the Attorney General's office said yesterday. Last year's bill, before it was diluted by the Lords amendments, would have allowed people to be prosecuted for using 'threatening, insulting or abusive behaviour'. Under the final version only 'threatening' behaviour is covered. The prosecution will also have to show intention to foment hatred rather than just recklessness.

In articles and interviews in other Sunday newspapers, Brown, Reid and Cameron have all pledged to be tough on terror. But Labour ministers questioned the Tory leader's approach, with Brown rejecting his call for a separate homeland security minister and Reid portraying his approach to anti-social young people as soft and 'downright dangerous.'

Cameron, in the Sunday Times, accuses the Labour government of 'confusing legislation for action' and says funding and policy attention should be focused on 'security, surveillance and Special Branch'.

Labour sources said last night that the law and order focus of the Queen's Speech was partly a bid to 'smoke out' the Tories' policies as 'talking tough but acting soft'.

.. <cont>

Guardian
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Old December 12th, 2006 #2
Geoff Beck
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Excellent survey of what's happening in our ancient homeland.

Mos Maiorum!
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Old May 10th, 2007 #3
James Hawthorne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoff Beck View Post
Excellent survey of what's happening in our ancient homeland.

Mos Maiorum!
Geoff I went over this report again - I mentioned in this report on 12/12/06... "You are going to hear at lot more from Nicholas Sarkozy"

Spooky! ... or good quiet National Socialist journalism ???

Now the little jew is President Sarkozy of France !!
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