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Old August 16th, 2008 #1
Alex Linder
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Default Interesting New Words for Potential Use

[list of animal adjectives - you know some of these - ursine, porcine, asinine, but there are plenty of others that, while uncommon, can be used to good comic effect. I believe one of our number has already gainfully employed struthious. Note that I am NOT sure all the below are spelled properly, as originally strutious was listed; dictionary.com says strutHious. Pronounced, stroo-the-uhs, accent on first syllable, referring to those of the Swayzean ilk. Note too that this thread is stickied, meaning it is archival, so your post may be edited for clarity, stupidity, and irrelevance. Not that you would ever post such a post, being a clear, intelligent, relevant carer and all. But if you know a good word, or can think of a good use of one of these, by all means have at it. Not looking for lengthy lists like this one, just for words that are uncommon yet potentially useful.]

Animal Name Animal Adjective

alligator eusuchian
ant formicine, myrmecine
anteater myrmecophagine
antelope alcelaphine, bubaline, antilopine
ape simian
armadillo tolypeutine
ass asinine
badger musteline
barracuda percesocine
bat pteropine, noctilionine
bear ursine
bee apiarian
bird avian, muscicapine, oscine (song)
passerine (perching), penduline, volucrine
bison bisontine
buffalo bubaline
bull taurine
butterfly pieridine, pierine
calf vituline
camel cameline
cat feline
chamois rupicaprine
chicken galline
civet viverrine
cobra elapine
coral coralline
cow bovine
crab cancrine
crocodile crocodilian
deer cervine, elaphine
dodo didine
dog canine
dolphin delphine
dormouse myoxine
dragon draconine
earthworm lumbricine
elephant elephantine
elk cervine
ermine musteline
ferret musteline
fish piscine
flea pulicine
flying fox pteropine
fox vulpine
frog ranine
gazelle gazelline
gerbil cricetine
gibbon hylobatine
giraffe giraffine
goat caprine, hircine (smelly)
hamster cricetine
hare leporine
hippopotamus hippopotamine
hog suilline
hornet vespine
horse equine
human hominine
hyena hyenine
kangaroo macropodine
leech hirudine
lemming microtine
lemur lemurine
leopard pardine
limpet patelline
lion leonine
lizard lacertilian, saurian
lobster homarine
louse pediculine
manatee manatine
marten musteline
mink musteline
mite acarine
mole talpine
mongoose viverrine, herpestine
moose cervine
mosquito aedine, anopheline
moth arctian
mouse murine
octopus octopine
opposum didelphine
oryx orygine
otter lutrine
ox bovine
oyster ostracine
panther pantherine
pig porcine, suilline
polecat musteline
porcupine hystricine
porpoise phocaenine
python pythonine
rabbit lapine
raccoon procyonine
ram arietine
rat murine
rattlesnake crotaline
reptile reptilian, serpentine
reindeer rangiferine
rhinoceros ceratorhine
rodent glirine
roebuck capreoline
sable zibeline
salamander salamandrine
sea horse hippocampine
sea lion otarine
seal phocine, otarine
serpent serpentine
sheep ovine
shrew soricine
silkworm bombycine
skunk musteline
slug limacine
smelt atherine
snake anguine, elapine, colubrine (garter,king)
ophidian, reptilian, serpentine, viperine
squirrel sciurine
stag cervine, elaphine
stoat musteline
sturgeon acipenserine
termite termitine
tick acarine
tiger tigrine
toad batrachian
tortoise chelonian, testudine
turtle chelonian
vole microtine
wasp vespine
weasel musteline
wolf lupine
wombat phascolomian
worm vermian
zebra zebrine, hippotigrine


Specific Bird Adjectives

Animal Name Animal Adjective

blackbird icterine
bluebird turdine
bullfinch pyrrhuline
bunting emberizine, pyrrhuloxine
buzzard buteonine, cathartine
cardinal pyrrhuloxine
cormorant phalacrocoracine
crane alectorine
crow corvine
cuckoo cuculine
dove columbine
duck anatine, fuliguline
eagle aquiline
falcon accipitrine
finch fringilline
goose anserine
gull larine
hawk accipitrine, falconine
hummingbird trochiline
jay garruline
kestrel falconine
kingfisher halcyonine
kite milvine
macaw psittacine
magpie garruline
mallard anatine
martin hirundine
meadowlark icterine
mockingbird mimine
nightingale philomelian
oriole icterine
ostrich/emu/rhea struthious
parrot psittacine
partridge perdicine
peacock pavonine
pheasant alectorine, phasianine
pigeon pullastrine
plover charadrine
quail coturnine
raven corvine
robin turdine
skylark alaudine
snipe charadrine
songbird oscine
sparrow passerine
stork ciconine
swallow hirundine
swan cygnine
swift cypseline
turkey meleagrine
vulture vulturine
woodcock charadrine, scolopacine
wren troglodytine
 
Old November 11th, 2008 #2
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Has the Tapir been purposely left out of the list?
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Old November 11th, 2008 #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kind Lampshade Maker View Post
Has the Tapir been purposely left out of the list?
not by me!
 
Old November 12th, 2008 #4
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I always liked "porcine" because it reminds one of what it sounds like,"portly," and it sounds comical.

"Bovine" also can be used good effect though, like the word "asinine," it may be a bit too common for what you want to use it for. The magic of these words is that they are considered sort of an intellectual way of putting people down. The comedy of it comes in the mildly understated nature of the insult. Like anything though, familiarity ruins comedy.

By the way Alex, have you ever studied Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP)? I have heard about it for years but haven't paid much attention because I associated it with what the British call "woo-woo" type stuff. I only started reading about it, and listening to some audio books, after I realized that many of the best marketing gurus have trained in NLP.

Anyway, one of the tenets of NLP is the importance of how language can be used to guide thought. Developing a vocabulary for your ideas is therefore important because it promotes patterns of thought that are associated with the ideas you are promoting. Once people develop positive patterns of thought associated with you, they are obviously more likely to think highly of you and your product or service.

This can be applied to anything of course, as the jew marxist well know. there is no reason we can't do the same however.

-Brian
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Old November 14th, 2008 #5
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[found this in review of book about Naipaul]

I think French is right to explain (which is not to condone) some of Naipaul's more provocative views as a form of mischief, which Trinidadians call picong, from the French piquant, a type of sharp talk where, in French's words, "the boundary between good and bad taste is deliberately blurred, and the listener sent reeling."

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/22062
 
Old November 14th, 2008 #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Stone View Post
Anyway, one of the tenets of NLP is the importance of how language can be used to guide thought. Developing a vocabulary for your ideas is therefore important because it promotes patterns of thought that are associated with the ideas you are promoting. Once people develop positive patterns of thought associated with you, they are obviously more likely to think highly of you and your product or service.
Silly stuff, in my view. In any case, my interest is producing effects, making the reader conscious of what he hadn't considered before. Plant doubt, move reader closer to White.
 
Old November 14th, 2008 #7
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BTW, I don't know the adj for tapir, but tapirine is elegant.

After hearing a middle class person take physical pleasure in rolling off 'tornadic activity,' rather than the modest 'tornadoe(s),' I began to beseek other applications of this lofty and supersyllabized term. 'Termitic activity,' or 'tapiric activity' are two early nuggets!

Someone was asking why I liked Fussell's "Class" so much. Well, one reason is he alerted me to the above - the middle class's love of pretentiousness as manifest in hypersyllabification, to denote a weight that just aint there. His book is full of this stuff. Full of both things I'd never thought of and answer to many questions I had. I have never seen a book that gives better explanation to why the people I grew up around -- ordinary middle-class suburbans -- acted the way they did.
 
Old November 15th, 2008 #8
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Perhaps, accusing someone of practicing Tapirism would be a polite way of pointing out that individual's Shyster-like behavior
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Old December 12th, 2009 #9
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[one of my fav words for (usually anonymous) twats offering free advice]

kib⋅itz
  /ˈkɪbɪts/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [kib-its] Show IPA Informal.

–verb (used without object)
1. to act as a kibitzer.
–verb (used with object)
2. to offer advice or criticism to as a kibitzer: to kibitz the team from the bleachers.

Origin:
1925–30, Americanism; < Yiddish kibetsn, equiv. to G kiebitzen to look on at cards, deriv. of Kiebitz busybody, lit., lapwing, plover

It's an annoying looker on, hovering and offering free annoying advice, while not daring to join the game himself.
 
Old October 8th, 2010 #10
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[in all my years of studying german, never came across this one: Fremdschämen - stranger-embarrassment - feeling embarrassed for/by the actions of others. i suppose feeling the embarrassment they should but don't feel because of their gross obliviousness.

pops up on jew-feminist-slutsite jezebel, in discussion of halloweenization of oktoberfest Tracht-wear

http://jezebel.com/5652502/germans-o...erfest-outfits

so two good words with no real english equivalent:

Schadenfreude - very slightly guilt-tinged pleasure in the misfortunes of others

and

Fremdschämen - feeling for others the embarrassment they should but dont feel for their dress, behavior, etc

[Also interesting, if you read the article, is that the dirdl or tracht is apparently on the order of the men's skirts in Scotland - made up by somebody 100 years ago, not truly traditional.]

Last edited by Alex Linder; October 8th, 2010 at 07:42 PM.
 
Old October 9th, 2010 #11
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More proof that 3rd gendered persons had not yet gained control of the fashion business, back then



Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
...Fremdschämen - feeling for others the embarrassment they should but dont feel for their dress, behavior, etc...
I've been around there for a long while and have never yet heard this expression. Sounds like a word a foreigner would invent to express a feeling he/she has and not any feeling shared by a German.
If anything, a German will look at others in a clinical manner as if they are standing in a testtube or are getting viewed under a microscope.
Unlike, say, in the Kwa or in Ireland, Germans extremely rarely criticize strangers in public, unless it's about some Battleax reprimanding some drunken homeless bum for calling his female dog a cunt. Social extremism of this type is likely to get sparked by a sexist event, if anything
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Last edited by Kind Lampshade Maker; October 9th, 2010 at 02:01 AM.
 
Old October 9th, 2010 #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kind Lampshade Maker View Post
More proof that 3rd gendered persons had not yet gained control of the fashion business, back then



I've been around there for a long while and have never yet heard this expression. Sounds like a word a foreigner would invent to express a feeling he/she has and not any feeling shared by a German.
I hadn't heard it either, but it seems about right to me.

Quote:
If anything, a German will look at others in a clinical manner as if they are standing in a testtube or are getting viewed under a microscope.
Unlike, say, in the Kwa or in Ireland, Germans extremely rarely criticize strangers in public
I noticed that too. Only time I really saw a mini-eruption was a fender bender when a couple women were getting into it. The one sounded like a cat issuing that drawn-out, increasingly high-pitched warning growl. Other than that, people tended to be quite stony-faced in public. It truly is odd to be in a place where there is a social stigma against jaywalking.
 
Old October 11th, 2010 #13
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Funny how contemporary Germans tend to get bent out of shape, through property damage. Even if it's a scratch on a toy plastic bumper on a new Toyota. However, when their kids get roughed up by Muds on the way to school, it seems to be only the kids' problem.
Getting back to inventing words, I'm guilty of such, myself. Sometimes you get to run in to one of these Germans who thinks he's immortal. In Kwa-speak, such are called "self-important". If you try directly translating this word, it turns out "selbstwichtig". Reading it, it makes sense. But, when conversing, the person you're talking to can't see that it's one word. They are more than likely to intercept what you're saying as "selbst wichtig" (he is important, himself) which goes way past their heads. I then tried to use a phrase called "selbstlegendär" (self-legendary). Unfortunately, I got the same puzzled look
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Old November 17th, 2010 #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
...Fremdschämen - feeling for others the embarrassment they should but dont feel for their dress, behavior, etc...
This link popped up, today:

http://bazonline.ch/leben/dossier/le...story/18534071

Quote:
...In Leserbriefen und Onlinekommentaren, auf Facebook, in Blogs posaunen Menschen heraus: «Ich schäme mich, Schweizer zu sein» oder «Ich schäme mich für die Schweiz», manche rufen sogar «Ich schäme mich, Mensch zu sein»...
Maybe, they use this term more often, if even exclusively, in Switzerland. Still doesn't make much sense, though. A direct translation: strange shaming/foreign shaming.
Germans often use the phrase "fremd gehen" (going unknown/going strange) to describe having sexual encounters with people who they haven't met before
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Old November 17th, 2010 #15
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Strange has been used for (new pussy) in the US too, altho I have never heard anyone actually use it that way, only seen it written a few times. It may be an older or Southern expression. Think Tom Petty may have used it in a song once.
 
Old November 18th, 2010 #16
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On a similar theme someone emailed me this list of modified words

MENSA INVITATIONAL
The Washington Post's Mensa Invitational once again invited readers to
take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or
changing one letter, and supply a new definition.

Here are the winners:

1. Cashtration (n.): The act of buying a house, which renders the subject
financially impotent for an indefinite period of time.

2. Ignoranus : A person who's both stupid and an asshole.

3. Intaxicaton : Euphoria at getting a tax refund, which lasts until you
realize it was your money to start with.

4. Reintarnation : Coming back to life as a hillbilly.

5. Bozone ( n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops
bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows
little sign of breaking down in the near future.

6. Foreploy : Any misrepresentation about yourself for the purpose of
getting laid.

7. Giraffiti : Vandalism spray-painted very, very high

8. Sarchasm : The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person
who doesn't get it.

9. Inoculatte : To take coffee intravenously when you are running late.

10. Osteopornosis : A degenerate disease. (This one got extra credit.)

11. Karmageddon : It's like, when everybody is sending off all these
really bad vibes, right? And then, like, the Earth explodes and it's like,
a serious bummer.

12. Decafalon (n.): The grueling event of getting through the day
consuming only things that are good for you.

13. Glibido : All talk and no action.

14. Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they
come at you rapidly.

15. Arachnoleptic Fit (n.): The frantic dance performed just after you've
accidentally walked through a spider web.

16. Beelzebug (n.): Satan in the form of a mosquito, that gets into your
bedroom at three in the morning and cannot be cast out.

17. Caterpallor ( n.): The color you turn after finding half a worm in the
fruit you're eating.

The Washington Post has also published the winning submissions to its
yearly contest, in which readers are asked to supply alternate meanings
for common words.

And the winners are:

1. Coffee, n.. The person upon whom one coughs.

2. Flabbergasted, adj. Appalled by discovering how much weight one has
gained.

3.. Abdicate, v. To give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach.

4 esplanade, v. To attempt an explanation while drunk.

5. Willy-nilly, adj. Impotent.

6.. Negligent, adj. Absentmindedly answering the door when wearing only a
nightgown.

7. Lymph, v. To walk with a lisp.

8. Gargoyle, n. Olive-flavored mouthwash.

9. Flatulence, n. Emergency vehicle that picks up someone who has been
run over by a steamroller.

10. Balderdash, n. A rapidly receding hairline.

11. Testicle, n. A humorous question on an exam.

12. Rectitude, n. The formal, dignified bearing adopted by proctologists.

13. Pokemon, n. A Rastafarian proctologist.

14. Oyster, n. A person who sprinkles his conversation with Yiddishisms.

15. Frisbeetarianism, n. The belief that, after death, the soul flies up
onto the roof and gets stuck there.

16. Circumvent, n. An opening in the front of boxer shorts worn by Jewish men
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Old November 18th, 2010 #17
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To deliver a baby could be misinterpreted by foreigners learning English as the act of removing the baby's liver

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
...Strange has been used for (new pussy) in the US too...
I heard a woman in a bar use the phrase "bekannt gehen" (going known), jokingly, of course, as a form of otherwise British word play to deride a German expression. Pretty creative, for a German (in that respect)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
...Strange has been used for (new pussy)...

...Think Tom Petty may have used it in a song once.
As singer of a band called The Travelling Willburys, Tom did a good job of exposing himself as a strange pussy
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Old November 18th, 2010 #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kind Lampshade Maker View Post
To deliver a baby could be misinterpreted by foreigners learning English as the act of removing the baby's liver

I heard a woman in a bar use the phrase "bekannt gehen" (going known), jokingly, of course, as a form of otherwise British word play to deride a German expression. Pretty creative, for a German (in that respect)

As singer of a band called The Travelling Willburys, Tom did a good job of exposing himself as a strange pussy
His backup band should have been called the Recalcitrants.

What is appealing about the South, to me, a non-Southerner, is the conception of life as something other than a meritocratic efficiency competition is wider spread. You can hear this in Petty's voice in many songs.
 
Old June 25th, 2012 #19
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I remember Müller talking after the loss against Inter about players with more hair on their backs than on their had who were just a lot more clever (he did not use clever but the word "abgefuckt" - there is not a really good translation for it - maybe even cheeky, devious, twisty). Inter might be full of internationals - but there is something really Italian about them.
 
Old June 26th, 2012 #20
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A few new Periodic Table elements of late;

Israelium; Most noxious substance known. Skunk spray is 1.911% Israelium.

Ignominium; Kanada UberGruppenFurher Harper wears an invisible Halo made of the stuff.

Incontium; Levels of Incontium rise late in life hence the need for Depends and Poise undergarments.
 
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