Vanguard News Network
VNN Media
VNN Digital Library
VNN Reader Mail
VNN Broadcasts

Old March 22nd, 2014 #21
Xerxes
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 58
Xerxes
Default

Quote:
They do it by being the world's cleverest speculators and gamblers."
Can they beat Jews?
 
Old March 23rd, 2014 #22
RickHolland
Bread and Circuses
 
RickHolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Jewed Faggot States of ApemuriKa
Posts: 6,492
Blog Entries: 1
RickHolland
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xerxes View Post
Can they beat Jews?
Even professional gamblers get swindled by Wall Street Jews.

__________________
Only force rules. Force is the first law - Adolf H. http://erectuswalksamongst.us/ http://tinyurl.com/cglnpdj Man has become great through struggle - Adolf H. http://tinyurl.com/mo92r4z Strength lies not in defense but in attack - Adolf H.
 
Old March 21st, 2015 #23
Kurt Krug
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Somewhere on Earth
Posts: 7
Kurt Krug
Default

This is my first post on this forum. I would have liked to have had a signature, but I can't figure out how to use that function here. Nevertheless, I wanted to post something here as this seems to be my biggest problem nowadays. (And my biggest blessing). That "thing" is work. I work a non-traditional role of which males who work my position try to get out and get into some other function within the "business entity." I don't consider myself racist, but I do hate the "gang mentality" that some blacks and Jews seem to have toward one another. Something that would cause a suspected Jewish guy to put a corny bumper sticker on his car with the African flag colors and a peace symbol on that continent. Weird.

So how does this relate to the post to which I'm replying? I just had a quick thought that there are Jews on both sides of the coin...Wall Street and other entities outside of Wall Street. Those who are "fighting" Wall Street, for example, but seem to prefer to promote from within simply based on someone's skin color (now more often than not, black, and more often than not, female)...

Just my "two cents." I hope someone can relate. Feel free to attack me too if you disagree.
 
Old March 24th, 2015 #24
Alex Linder
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 43,394
Blog Entries: 34
Alex Linder
Default

CONFESSIONS OF AN OVEREDUCATED A/C MAN

by Albert Morgan | on March 18, 2015

There is a specter haunting Middle America—the specter of higher education.

For a young person in America, college is the thing to aspire to. It’s the go-to option for virtually every American looking to maintain or enhance his station in life. Higher education embodies the values, hopes and dreams of millions of young people and their families. The stories write themselves. Here a first generation freshman, out to do his family proud. There a young woman out to better herself and shatter a glass ceiling or two. Everywhere the expectation that “This Is How You Get The Good Life.” Why, without the credentials offered by as prestigious as institution as one’s ability, tenacity, savings and, yes, connections can muster, you’re liable to be stuck with the dregs—working dead end jobs with no hope of advancement, living wages, or health insurance!

What tripe.

Next time you’re in a coffee shop, ask your barista if they’re going to school and for what. Or better still ask if they’ve graduated. Ask your bartender. Ask your server. Ask the guy stocking groceries at the Whole Foods. If they’re not still in high school, odds are they’re enrolled, in school or recent grads. Odds are good they’ll find themselves doing something similar after graduation.

College has changed since the Baby Boomers were their kids’ age. Their idea of college, however, seems to have been last updated during the Reagan administration. What Boomers think of as a safe space for ideas, for debate, for the exchange of knowledge is for Millennials a place of rigid ideological conformity, speech laws and “conversations” on controversial topics that resemble nothing as much as a struggle session for those hapless souls following the old script of debate and rationality.

While the Boomers could expect to go to college and be among the 30% or so of their generation that did, two thirds of Millennials attend such institutions. This has degraded the elite atmosphere of college, one that insisted on high standards and only admitted those able to meet them. In an effort to expand their income and to meet the egalitarian expectations of their potential customers, academia has been steadily debasing its own intellectual currency to admit lower quality students.

Not that administrators or the various victim-studies professors much mind or care. While the average student is now in need of remedial classes, that same student is paying far more out of pocket for the privilege of relearning what he didn’t master in high school. And then he will go on to required courses in Women’s or African American or Chicano Studies. When Boomers went to school, these parasitic pseudo-disciplines were still embryonic rather than metastasized.

Between the lower quality of the student and the lower quality of the instruction, employers have taken notice. College degrees don’t mean what they used to. Even the stronger STEM disciplines are under attack from a combination of private sector rentseekers looking to “diversify” tech by pressuring companies into hiring net negative ( but “diverse”) workers. Possibly more insidious is the efforts of feckless captains of industry to import ever more HB1 tech workers from Asia to dilute the labor pool and lower average wages.

Of course none of that was the case for Boomers. By the relative rarity of their degrees and the acknowledgment that it took real work and talent to earn them, a Bachelors of the Arts was a viable meal ticket. Compare this to our current situation, where 40%+ of college grads take jobs that don’t require a college degree. Most of them will be liberal arts degrees and possibly even more pitiable degrees in laughable disciplines such as the aforementioned victim studies.

Who is to blame for this mess? Why did it get this way? Boomer cultural norms simultaneously incentivised college and dumbed it down. Other forms of honest, well paid work such as trades or skilled labor were frowned upon, putting them out of sight, out of mind for many young people, especially young men. Many such jobs were offshored along with the American manufacturing, thus eliminating them as an option to begin with in some cases.

Millennials are not innocent either. Despite being, as a generation, coddled, insulated from criticism or failure, they are now becoming the masters of their destiny, and many are proving every bit as selfish and clueless as their piggish forebears. Demands for ever more state intervention to subsidize college are very common. Blame for the situation, although rightly put upon a number of factors outside of their control, rarely includes any agency on their part. An expectation of upper middle class wealth, status and jobs right after graduation with little to no effort, seems ubiquitous.

I myself was not immune, either to my own personal failings or those set up for me. My story is sadly typical: My parents were Boomers who never went to college. As I came of age in 2005-2007, My options were presented to me:

“Your standardized test scores are high. Go to college. Trades are for idiots and the military is for patriotic idiots. You’re elite material.”

“And major in what?”

“Whatever you want. College will get you a job.”

Being a young man I expressed interest in military service but was met with stiff resistance from parents, administrators and guidance counselors. I cannot recall anyone admiring the value of patriotism, of duty, or even of using the service cynically as a roundabout way to pay for college with the GI Bill. For a young man eager to do well by his community and respectful of authority figures in his life, uniform advice pointing in one direction was compelling.

Thus, I went to college. Being of modest means I could only afford state school. Having been told to follow my passion, I majored first in history. My own faults begin creeping in here. I studied hard but also partied hard. I had a vague notion that history was useful only for teaching high school. Then I thought about switching to Political Science since I was interested in politics and theory (and since practicing law seemed like a vague, attractive, physically easy job that had a fantastic income potential). I changed my major and called it a day.

I studied in good faith, but as I read more and more material of the alternative right both in the US and Europe, I began to drift from the received ideology of my professors and peers. The rift was a positive feedback cycle driving me further and further away from what I was learning in school. By day I could listen with a straight face to pie-in-the-sky absurdity from the likes of Rawls and by night, assuming I wasn’t being a hedonist with the best of my generation, I was reading Moldbug, Roissy and Alternative Right and growing more and more skeptical of what professors were teaching.

Interactions in the classroom highlighted the divide. In legal classes I defended natural law. In political theory classes I dissented openly. Professors grilled me hard and I noticed it in their grading. Nitpicks became demerits and disagreements became wrong answers. It came as no surprise to me that requests for letters of recommendation after graduation went coolly unanswered.

As I approached my senior year my various contradictions reached a culmination. I became aware I hadn’t done any due dilligence as far as if I wanted to go to law school. And, as my legal studies classes were making obvious to me, I had no particular interest in the minutia of jurisprudence. I finally did some research on the salaries, working conditions and opportunities for lawyers in the real world and found it dismal. I wasn’t a rich kid. Did I really want to sink 100K into 3 more years of this mess I was coming to dislike already? For maybe 45-50K if not unemployment? Decidedly not. College advisers had nothing of value to say concerning my situation. In the waning days of my senior year the vague, Boomer drivel that “Diplomas guarantee a good job” was found to be a cruel joke. At best only a degree specifically targeted to the demands of the market, rather than pinned to hopes of sliding into middle management somewhere in corporate America, would have made my college investment of any utility.

A shame I found that out second semester, senior year.

I graduated with a lump in my throat and a stinging sensation of shame and failure. I had been misled utterly, yes, but I also made bad decisions on my own. Although I was correcting them to some degree (discovering the degree was useless, writing it off, cleaning up my college-subsidized hedonistic degeneracy), I had a lot of work to do. As the Alt-Right had made me aware of a great number of pretty lies, it had also inculcated a value set in me that came to detest shrugging my situation away into apathy and slackerdom. I wanted a wife. Children. I still wanted a good life in a solid community. I would need to work.

After a a few fitful attempts to leverage my degree that ended in failure, I began to look into the trades. Young men I had scoffed at as rubes or laboring proles as a teen, I now saw were my age with solid incomes and lives that were budding into the sort I wanted for myself. I made up my mind to go to trade school and then I saw how strong some of my conditioning was. It took me weeks and months of low level, but gradually diminishing agonizing to simply get over the fact that I was going to be “blue collar” instead of “white.” A petty, largely meaningless distinction but one so bound up with what I was told was of such supreme importance to my status, happiness and well being that I was surprised to see how strongly it resonated in me. Boomer values at work. Pwned as Moldbug himself would say.

In time I got over it. In time I found I understood machines and detail related to my selected trade, HVAC, relatively easily. Study habits gained from being a bookish kid and 16 years in school paid off for absorbing the material. I physically hardened as I acclimated to demanding work. My hothouse sensitivities, tastes and values were cast off one by one.

HVAC has since given me a far more remunerative job than I ever had before college or as a result of my degree. It’s a demanding, masculine profession being almost completely male, lining up with my growing sense of wanting to do work that would reinforce manly values in direct contrast to the mushy, unisex world of the university and the academy. It was plainly useful work that makes some of the technological aspects of the modern world, that part of modernity I have not come to detest, possible in many ways. It challenged me and continues to challenge me still.

As a young man, it’s helped me to find a better place in my life and in my community. The fact that a trade helped to do this so readily, naturally and at a far quicker pace is part of what makes college as it’s presently instituted such a damning blight on my generation.

How many men have been deprived of the chance to do honest, useful, empowering work to instead play status games, take drugs, and wind up indebted and underemployed by following the advice given in increasingly bad faith by society’s elite? How many young women fritter away some of their best years on preparation for sterile office jobs while degrading their ability to ever pair bond with a husband by engaging in equally sterile rutting with men who value her little beyond sexual access? How many families are being delayed or never formed from this arrangement? How many billions of dollars and man hours are being squandered on an egalitarian pipe dream?

The answer is “Too many.”

Change is in the air, however. College enrollment has flatlined. Editorials, replete with stories like mine and statistics to back them up are slowly filtering into middle America. The dour, prissy, hysterical atmosphere of political correctness that wafts over virtually every college campus in America is repellent to young men, who are turning away in greater numbers every year.

Where a society channels the energy of its young men is drastically important, and, as the farce of higher education in early 21st Century America begins to be known, fewer of those young men will put their energies into it. There is ample opportunity for them to put it elsewhere. Into learning skills that will render them better men mentally and physically, into their own pursuits according to their own values, into discovering what else they were misled about by their leaders. And from there, perhaps, into kinship with the Right.

http://theden.tv/2015/03/18/confessi...ucated-ac-man/
 
Old April 17th, 2015 #25
Kurt Krug
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Somewhere on Earth
Posts: 7
Kurt Krug
Default Hitler's Birthday in Three Days

As I write this, I contemplate that Adolf Hitler's birthday is in three days, on April 20th. I'm writing with a solid heart and with much on my mind. I read the previous article posted here by one of the administrators. It's on my heart that I was wrong about something. The individual who has the car with the African Peace symbol on it (is it Rasta?) is not who I thought it was. I thought it was this suspected Jewish guy I know in my office. (And I know a lot of "suspected Jews" in my office). I also meant to write that the Jews and blacks have a "gang mentality" with one another and not the word toward.

I did read the whole article that Alex Linder posted. I have a lot of feedback, but not a lot of time to write. Firstly, I'd just like to say that I don't trust a lot of tradespeople. I spent time in a trade (electrical) work in the military...wasting my life doing what was a "masculine" job just because my recruiter told me that my job that I wanted, Weather Specialist, was in the electrical field. Had I gotten the job I wanted, I would probably be happily floating weather balloons and reading the forecast to a bunch of public audiences.

Oh well, my demise. I blame myself for some of my decisions. I don't so much blame races of people. I'm in an admin position in an office. Yes, white collar, borderline blue collar. I like what I'm doing on some days, but not on others. It's amazing the "nigger and kyke mentality" I see in the office, which pisses me off and makes me take it home to my wife and kids. There are some black and Jewish people I would respectively call "people..." humans, as it were; then there are the "Nazi" blacks and Jews...the ones who "gang up" with their ridiculous Ernie from Sesame Street-like snickering and constant talking about other people.

It's really the kykes and niggers who do this. And when some nigger bitch comes along and calls me a militant in the workplace because I rejected her to go to her house for my birthday when she asked me, and to ask me if I'm married and I told her "yes." This bitch also knew about the military history and background that I possess.

But there is some kyke I like to knock in my home, out loud thinking. Supposedly he's the person with the highest authority in the office. Ironically, the management trickles down in Jewish fashion. It's laughable, but true. My workplace does not really honestly value diversity so much as it values keeping the money with the Jews. Hoarding Kykes! My argument regarding the Nazi "Holocaust" was that the "Nazis" were really the German people and the Jews were stealing the German people's money and wealth away!

I saw how much my grandmother had been through with her constant talk and blaming of the Jews. I saw how much my grandfather had been through with his constant blaming of the blacks. It hurt me to see all of that, and all the arguments, at least most of them, were about that subject with my grandparents.

Now I have niggers and kykes in my office (I'm WASP) who think they know everything by mentioning the Gestapo, etc. against me 'cuz I really do have a German-type name. In fact, this conjurs up memories of a dream I just had last night. I was talking about my heritage and I was actually trying to defend my name...that my people were sympathetic toward the Jews (historically) rather than hostile. Is this true? I'm just not sure. What I do know is that I don't have any Nazis in my family that I know of, historically. Even if I did, I'm not sure how I would feel about the subject of having them in my distant family.

That's my "two cents" for now. Thank you for the article, Alex Linder, Administrator! And thank you all for letting me vent against the niggers and kykes who hear things about me through the wire and try to use it against this bachelor's degree grad from an Ivy League university!
 
Old July 11th, 2015 #26
RickHolland
Bread and Circuses
 
RickHolland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Jewed Faggot States of ApemuriKa
Posts: 6,492
Blog Entries: 1
RickHolland
Default

Quote:
Why We Wind Up on the Wrong Career Path and What To Do About It

You don’t have to look very far to find people who are trapped in the wrong job or profession. Carpenters who should have been accountants. Accountants who should have been horticulturists. Horticulturists who should have opened an animal shelter.

Having worked with career changers for nearly a decade, I’ve found there are four reasons why people get, or stay, on the wrong career path. You’ll soon see that the obvious reason — money — didn’t make the list. That’s because, unless you are truly at the subsistence level, I find that money is all too often an excuse used to mask deeper issues. Let’s take a closer look at what some of those issues might be.

1. Listening to Your Head and not Your Heart

Billy Wilder once said, "Trust your instincts. Your mistakes might as well be your own instead of someone else’s." Instinct speaks to us in many forms. Sometimes it’s an unsettling flutter in the solar plexus warning you that something isn’t quite right here. Other times instinct whispers encouragingly in your ear, "Go this way." And sometimes instinct makes itself known as an unmistakable and heart-pounding, "NOOOOOOOOOOO!"

I learned the hard way about ignoring these internal yellow, green, and red lights. It was 1993 and I was commuting 90 miles a day to my corporate job when a marketing job came up in a smaller company with half the commute. I had a good interview with the Vice President of Sales to whom the position reported.

He seemed like a decent enough guy, confident and amiable in that way people in sales often are. A week later we were on the phone negotiating my salary. When I tried to discuss a higher salary his whole demeanor abruptly changed. His voice took on a kind of annoyed edginess that teetered on rude.

A flag went up immediately. Instinct said, "There’s something not quite right about this guy." After a sleepless night I did what a lot of people do when money or fear or both are involved: I let my rational mind shout down my wiser inner voice. "It’s still a great salary." "The benefits are good." "It’s so much closer to home." "He was probably just having a bad day."

Of course my instincts were right. My new boss turned out to be an egotistical fist pounder who could be charming and rational one minute and a raging bull the next. This experience taught me a valuable but painful lesson about instinct. More often than not, the heart has a far more sophisticated early warning system than does the head.

2. Turning Other People’s Dreams into Your Own

Whenever I do a career consultation my client’s are assigned the task of putting together a list of things they love to do. I recently had the pleasure of working with an engaging young engineer from Portland, Oregon named Manish. It was clear from the beginning that Manish was struggling to come up with his list. I think a lot of the problem had to do with the fact that he’s spent years living someone else’s dream. But I’ll let Manish tell you his story in his own words:

"When I was young and unsure of what I wanted to be when I grew up, I asked my dad ‘What would be a good job to have when I grow up?’ He told me, ‘an engineer.’ I didn’t really know what an engineer did, but I figured I could do it. I made it a goal of mine to become an Engineer and made a point to take classes in school that would prepare me for this line of work.

I was enrolled in an engineering prep class in high school, and one day we got to visit a local universities engineering department. From that point on, I knew that the engineering field was not for me, but did not listen to my inner-voice and continued towards my goal. In fact, I found myself more curious about the people around me than anything else. I found myself almost distracted by everyday behavior and didn’t pay much attention to the engineering department tour. More on this interest of mine in a minute…

While in high school, I spent a lot of time with my older brother of 7 years in his garage working on, and mainly playing with, cars, motorcycles, boats, etc. Now I can’t remember if it was because of my lack of technical savvy or my continual rambling on about ‘psychological stuff,’ but my brother would interrupt me now and again by saying, ‘Are you sure you want to be an engineer? You should go into Psychology.’ I never took him serious, or anyone else who told me this, because I thought every other career was less than being an engineer. So without putting any thought to it, I continued towards my goal.

When I entered college and signed up for my engineering coursework, I was faced with the reality of engineering not being very interesting to me within the first term. To top it off, I wasn’t very good at it either. Still determined to achieve my goal, I told myself I can’t give up (so stubborn of me). So I ended up in a field similar to engineering called Safety Engineering or Occupational Health and Safety.

Safety had some technical stuff to it, but it also had some behavioral stuff to it. I thought I had hit the jackpot… but to make a long story short, I hadn’t. Safety was 10% fun and 90% not. I’ve been in the field for a little over six years now and I’m ready to make the jump. Funny thing is, my wife says that I’ve been talking about getting into school counseling or any other field since I started in my first job out of college. I wonder why I never listened to myself…until now "

Manish is certainly not alone in turning a deaf ear to one’s inner calling. Classrooms and professions are filled with people who are living someone else’s dreams. That’s because it’s not the major, or the job, or the career path itself that’s so hard to let go of. What’s hard to give up is other people’s approval — especially if they happen to be people you love and respect. Walking away from a career, even one you know deep inside is all wrong for you, means risking that esteem. As Manish is learning though, it’s never too late to start listening to the one person who knows more than anyone else about your true gifts and interests — you!

We’ve all received — and perhaps continue to receive — a lot of subtle, (and perhaps not so subtle) messages about what we should "be" work-wise. But outside pressure isn’t the only reason Manish and a lot of other people push on in dogged pursuit of a profession for which there is little real interest. That leads us to two more closely related reasons why otherwise intelligent people get and stay on the wrong career path.

3. Not Being Willing to Admit you Made a Mistake


As Manish’s story also demonstrates, the real pressure that keeps us on the wrong path is self-generated. At some point along the way, Manish shifted from fulfilling his father’s notion of the ideal profession to not wanting to give up on what had become a personal mission. Despite his brother’s attempts to point Manish toward the right road, he opted to continue on like a driver who stubbornly refuses to admit he’s lost.

The good news is Manish has wisely decided it’s time to pull over to ask for directions and is now heading toward his true gifts. The bad news is there are far too many other lost drivers on the highway of life who are still unwillingness to admit they’re going the wrong way.

Despite the occasional story about a physician who left to become a florist or an attorney turned singer, the overwhelming majority of unhappy people choose to stay miserably stuck largely out of pride. For a lot of people it’s a lot easier to keep that lousy job than to stand up and admit to the world that they zigged when they should have zagged.

4. Not Wanting to "Waste" the Degree

Then there are those who really did love their chosen career — at least in the beginning. But over time, they and their occupation, well, they just grew apart. If this sounds familiar, chances are what keeps you on the wrong path is, just like a relationship gone bad, it’s hard to walk away from a career into which you’ve put so much time and effort to say nothing of the financial investment.

Take my friend Donna. After earning her master’s degree in social work some fifteen years ago, she went into private practice as a family therapist. For the first five or so years Donna got a lot of satisfaction out of helping others. For the last ten though, her work has felt more like a burden. So what keeps her there? It’s simple. Donna doesn’t want to "waste" the degree.

Now I know it’s not easy to turn your back on an established career, especially if it’s one that pays well, has some prestige associated with it, or required earning some kind of advanced degree. And yet, think about the logic here. If you identify with Donna’s dilemma what you’re really telling yourself is. "I’ve wasting the last 10 years of my life so I might as well throw away the next 20 as well. To hell with my true gifts, I’ve got more suffering to do"

John Powell once said, "The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing." If you identify with any (or all) of the four reasons for getting and staying on the wrong career path, don’t waste time despairing. Instead learn and then act.

The fact of the matter is we all get lost from time to time. That’s life. The danger comes when we fail to heed the road signs and thus remain stuck in the breakdown lane. I have an abiding belief that everything in life happens for a reason. The key is to find the lessons.

Even my job with the boss from hell offered invaluable lessons and experiences. In addition to getting to travel the country, I learned in no uncertain terms to trust my instincts. That job was also just the catalyst I needed to make my final exit from the j-o-b world. And, as importantly, it introduced me to meet people who’ve been integral to helping me succeed as a solo entrepreneur.

What should you do if you find yourself on the wrong career path? We’ll, if you’re living with the consequences of having long ignored your better instincts, get a pen and paper, find some quiet space, and put your listening ears on. Then write down everything that little voice has been trying to tell you but this time without censor or rationalization.

If you’ve been living someone else’s dream then take a good look at what’s really going on. Some questions you might want to ask yourself are: What does having other people’s approval or meeting someone else’s needs help me avoid or get? What price am I paying for this approval? Does the cost outweigh the benefits? If so, it’s time to start exploring your own dreams.

If you’re hanging onto a job or career because of all the time and money you’ve invested then the first thing you’ll want to do is to let yourself get close to your fear. I’m not talking about the fear of letting the world know you made a mistake or financial angst. What I’m talking about is getting in touch with the one thing that should really scare the heck out of you — namely, never getting to experience what your life would be like if you pursued your true gifts and passions.

Once you’ve let that little reality sink in, sit down and write a "Dear John" letter to your past love. Tell your career that while it has been a good and faithful partner for some time that you have simply fallen out of love. It will understand. Then pick up a paintbrush, look into culinary school, or otherwise start courting your new love interests.

It’s easy to find yourself on the wrong career track. When that happens, the key is to stay alert for warning lights, watch for the signposts along the way, learn from those inevitable detours, ask for directions, and then start slowly inching your way onto that big expansive highway called Your Life! As George Bernard Shaw once observed, "A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing."

by Valerie Young
http://www.employmentspot.com/employ...g-career-path/
__________________
Only force rules. Force is the first law - Adolf H. http://erectuswalksamongst.us/ http://tinyurl.com/cglnpdj Man has become great through struggle - Adolf H. http://tinyurl.com/mo92r4z Strength lies not in defense but in attack - Adolf H.

Last edited by RickHolland; July 11th, 2015 at 02:28 PM.
 
Old September 17th, 2015 #27
Kurt Krug
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Somewhere on Earth
Posts: 7
Kurt Krug
Default

Thanks, RickHolland. Your location is a bit "taboo"-sounding, but you have an interesting copy and paste. I read parts of it. Using a degree is important, but sometimes the utilization is blocked when you have closed minded people working at a university, for example, who might be promoting and hiring from within, or based on an individual's immigrant status, for example. This is wrong, and more often than not, we might find that the individuals at our alma maters might have graduated from a different university and may not even deserve to be there at our unis.
 
Old September 20th, 2015 #28
JeffreyWaffenSS
Senior Member
 
JeffreyWaffenSS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 2,513
JeffreyWaffenSS
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in Denver View Post
Cooks, even in the best restaurants make almost nothing, usually $10 an hour, maybe with luck, $12 an hour, and they work very hard under pressure. If they've gone to a reputable culinary school they make, let's see...oh yeah! still $12 an hour. If they get a good reputation and have years of experience and move to the big city and get a job as kitchen manager, they can move up to, if they are very lucky, $24,000 to $28,000 a year...and very few ever get to this level. I know a woman who is the restaurant manager in an elite restaurant in Denver. She's been in the industry all her adult life and she is over 50. She has a reputation among restaurants that is enviable. She makes about $40,000 a year and has to pay for most of her health insurance.

Here is what you do:

1. Get a degree in engineering and move to a state that has a large aerospace industry. Get a job and stay there as long as you can. Pay attention to other large aerospace companies in the area and keep good relations with other engineers. If there are going to be layoffs at your company either bail to another company or at least always be prepared to bail to another aerospace company.

2. Learn a good difficult skill, such as welding. Get every certification that is valid and reputable. Move to a state and city that has lots of manufacturing that needs your skill. Best if it is a union state. Do whatever it takes to get union certification. Work in that skill taking advantage of every union benefit you can. If you hate unions and jack-off to Austrian school libertarian fantasies... that's fine. Do it at home and keep it to yourself.

Jobs suck...pretty much all jobs suck. Goods jobs are rare, and getting rarer (more rare to the illiterate.) It's about survival, not engaging in dreams about being a culinary expert with your own PBS show. You ain't gonna make that happen. You fucking gird your loins and work. If you've shown some judgment you might still make decent money. Keep your hobbies and fantasies at home.

Mike

Oh! And there is a third way, but I won't tell you that way.
Reading this thread, but I thought Right to Work States according to the patriotards have high job growth compared to union states. Missouri republicans failed to override Jay Nixon's right to work veto just last week.
 
Old September 23rd, 2015 #29
Ray Allan
Senior Member
 
Ray Allan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Prison Planet Destructon Quadrant 6
Posts: 6,738
Ray Allan
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffreyWaffenSS View Post
Reading this thread, but I thought Right to Work States according to the patriotards have high job growth compared to union states. Missouri republicans failed to override Jay Nixon's right to work veto just last week.
Nevada is also a right-to-work state and it has the nation's highest unemployment rate. Illegal beaners keep pouring in, breeding, driving their brand new cars to the Salvation Army for free food and doing the few jobs left here that White folks won't do . But never fear, our illustrious Gov. Brian Sandoval says the state is in a recovery. For who exactly?
__________________
"Military men are dumb, stupid animals to be used as pawns for foreign policy."

--Henry A. Kissinger, jewish politician and advisor
 
Old October 11th, 2015 #30
JeffreyWaffenSS
Senior Member
 
JeffreyWaffenSS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 2,513
JeffreyWaffenSS
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
Nevada is also a right-to-work state and it has the nation's highest unemployment rate. Illegal beaners keep pouring in, breeding, driving their brand new cars to the Salvation Army for free food and doing the few jobs left here that White folks won't do . But never fear, our illustrious Gov. Brian Sandoval says the state is in a recovery. For who exactly?
So other words there is job growth in Right to Work States but it's the growth for the spics.

Here in FL spics do a lot of the construction jobs. In St. Louis the niggers were complaining the construction unions were racist because they wouldn't hire niggers. One state rep nigger from the Ferguson area introduced a right to work bill for trade industries because he said nigs in his district can't get construction jobs because the union shops won't hire them.
 
Old May 13th, 2018 #31
Crowe
Senior Member
 
Crowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,527
Crowe
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breanna View Post
I have heard that welding is a bad thing to get into because the radiation or chemicals mutate men's sperm, can make them infertile and even cause cancer.
I know this is an old post, but I'm going to address this anyway.

Yes, there are risks involved with welding. But there are risks involved with many other trades as well. UV radiation exposure can be limited by wearing thick clothing, and other equipment. There is also a risk for inhaling metal particles, especially when you're grinding. There are chemicals and other hazards involved with pretty much any trade out there.

The point is, somebody has to do it, and welders can make decent money. We're talking middle class income potential. And most of the risks can be severely mitigated or eliminated entirely by using safety equipment, and basic common sense.

Risks are involved in any other trade. Mechanics, carpenters, plumbers, electricians, HVAC techs, machininsts, maintenance, etc. Men need to do these jobs because not everyone's fit for professional desk jobs, and these are of most of the decent paying male dominated jobs in any 1st world country.

I don't think most American youth are being equipped to really do these jobs. Kids these days are way too soft, and these are jobs where you're gonna get dirty, cut, and bruised up occasionally. The future income potential for these jobs is only going to go up, especially for service sector trades like HVAC, mechanics, plumbers, electricians and maintenance, due to the lack of new blood getting into these trades. After all the old guys retire, any young man who's not a complete pussy will be able to name their price in one of the above trades. There will be way too much competition for management positions, and cushy desk jobs.
__________________
Low-IQ bible scholars are legion, the big book o' bullshit is catnip to the underbrained. --ALEX LINDER
 
Old May 13th, 2018 #32
Crowe
Senior Member
 
Crowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,527
Crowe
Default

He're is what I'd recommend any young man do, learn one of these trades:

- Electrician
- Plumber
- HVAC
- Maintenance (sorta a jack of all trades position)

If you're not sure what you want to do, the above trades are always looking for "helpers". There is no harm in trying out multiple trades to find one you like the most. Starting out, you'll be someone's little gopher, as in "go for X tool", and clean up this mess after we're done, but you'll get to see how they do things, and be sure to ask questions. Show them you're dead serious, and show them that you possess basic common sense, and they'll start giving you more responsibilities.

Here is the reality, if you go fresh out of high school into an electrician's helper position, stick with it for 4-5 years, by the time you're 22-23 years old, you'll be making a lot more money than some snowflake who wasted 4-5 years of their life by getting a degree that's not marketable. Only 4 year degrees that are going to seriously beat trade skill positions are medical, science or engineering positions. And that's only if you work for somebody else. If you get a master license at some point, you can make 6 figures. Getting a trade skill master license is honestly one of the easiest and lowest risk types of small businesses to run. All you need is skills, tools, a work vehicle, and proper documentation. If it doesn't work out, you can take that truck and tools and go work for somebody else.

Regardless of the economy, they are going to need electricians, plumbers, HVAC, and maintenance people. Your position isn't at risk when the (((market))) busts.
__________________
Low-IQ bible scholars are legion, the big book o' bullshit is catnip to the underbrained. --ALEX LINDER
 
Reply

Share


Thread
Display Modes


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:43 AM.
Page generated in 0.14464 seconds.