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Old February 26th, 2009 #21
Peer Fischer
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The cost might be prohibitive for certain methods of getting potable water, but if it becomes necessary it can be done. You can even tow icebergs from the poles & melt 'em if it comes to that. I don't think the planet is going the way of "Dune" anytime soon though where we'll all be wearing stillsuits and stuff like that. It's a regional issue right now, all it means is population will gradually shift to other areas.
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #22
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Salt can be found almost anywhere.
The area in and around the Great Lakes is one of the biggest deposit on Earth stretching from Wisc., through Ill., Ind., Oh., into Penn.
Two of the largest salt mining operations in the world are outside of Cleveland.
The shits everywhere, it's not exactly at a premium.
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Old February 26th, 2009 #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeTodd View Post
Salt can be found almost anywhere.
The area in and around the Great Lakes is one of the biggest deposit on Earth stretching from Wisc., through Ill., Ind., Oh., into Penn.
Two of the largest salt mining operations in the world are outside of Cleveland.
The shits everywhere, it's not exactly at a premium.
Not now, but it used to be. That was the pay for a Roman soldier.

In the Civil War, the South lacked it. The governor of NC opened salt mines on the coast of the state.
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Old February 26th, 2009 #24
odin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deathtozog View Post

I think that's a map of Mexico.
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #25
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Originally Posted by Steve B View Post
So your wife is functionally retarded?


You need to watch your language around women-folk.
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odin View Post
I think that's a map of Mexico.
Yes sir, I goofed. Clicked the wrong pic.



Quote:
Hydroelectric power is a major source of California's electricity. In 2007, hydroelectric power plants produced 43,625 gigawatt-hours of electricity, or 14.5 percent of the total.
Note, another report puts it at 20%

Quote:
  • Northern California is used to getting power from the Pacific Northwest. However, due to a lack of rain this season (the fourth driest year on record for the Columbia River and Snake River regions), the Pacific Northwest has not had much hydroelectric power for sale. Water normally saved for the summer is being used now for California from the Columbia river dams. Normally the Pacific Northwest contributes 11% of California's power, mostly from hydroelectric.
  • The Pacific Northwest snowfall is only 61% of normal, which might produce 25% less hydroelectric power this summer from this source. Washington and Oregon get 85% of their electric power from hydroelectric. Typically we sell them power in the winter, and they sell us power in the early summer when the runoff is greatest.
http://www.physics.uci.edu/~silverma/hydrogas.html

Quote:
Definition: "World Water War"
"This is a term devised by environmentalists for a type of conflict (most probably a form of guerrilla warfare) due to an acute shortage of water for drinking and irrigation. About 40 per cent of the world’s populations are already affected to some degree, but population growth, climate change and rises in living standards will worsen the situation: the UN Environment Agency warns that almost 3 billion people will be severely short of water within 50 years. Possible flash points have been predicted in the Middle East, parts of Africa and in many of the world’s major river basins, including the Danube. The term has been used for some years to describe disputes in the southern and south-western United States over rights to water extraction from rivers and aquifers." --Michael Quinion, World Wide Words, 1996-2006.
Quote:
How the West's Energy Boom Could Threaten Drinking Water for 1 in 12 Americans
The Colorado River, the life vein of the Southwestern United States, is in trouble. The river's water is hoarded the moment it trickles out of the mountains of Wyoming and Colorado and begins its 1,450-mile journey to Mexico's border. The river is already so beleaguered by drought and climate change that one environmental study called it the nation's "most endangered" waterway. Researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography warn the river's reservoirs could dry up in 13 years. Now a rush to develop domestic oil, gas and uranium deposits along the river and its tributaries threatens its future. Although company executives insist they adhere to environmental laws, natural gas drilling has led to numerous toxic spills across the West. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, mining has already contaminated four out of 10 streams and rivers in the West.
http://www.worldwaterwars.com/

http://www.napavalleyregister.com/ar...c323126380.txt
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Last edited by Joe_J.; February 26th, 2009 at 08:39 PM.
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #27
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Something Sam Kinison said about water and living in a desert impressed me:
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #28
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Default Nothing promotes conservation like high prices...

The Southwest is semi-arid. Desert means evaporation exceeds precipitation. World watershed-- mountains with vegetation-- is rapidly diminishing, a phenomena known as desertification. The vast majority of it is long gone. Populations in semi-arid areas arguably are not sustainable at current levels.Government has a conflict of interest: Facilitating development for revenue's sake.

One should read the classic, "The Tragedy of the Commons," by Garrett Hardin, for a complete education www.garretthardinsociety.org. Price is how you allocate scarce resources rather than socializing them, which creates scarcity.

Utilities should give-away low-flow showerheads, less than 1.6 gal. flush toilets, etc., like electric companies are giving-away compact fluorescent lamps. Its cost-effective because it costs less than providing more supply. They know this. www.rmi.org.

Cadillac Desert is a good primer on the problem.
Amazon.com: Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water, Revised Edition: Marc Reisner: Books Amazon.com: Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water, Revised Edition: Marc Reisner: Books


Encounters with the Arch Druid
is an excellent examination of the thinking of the Bureau of Reclamation vs the Greenies on the water issue and the environment generally.

Last edited by -JC; February 26th, 2009 at 08:55 PM.
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #29
Wagner
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Maybe the Chinks will bring some extra water with them.


Chink vultures chomp at the carcass of formerly White Cali-Kosova
[podblanc]play37066[/podblanc]
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Old February 26th, 2009 #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B View Post
As PS told you. The energy, time, money and cleanup required to desalinate seawater is prohibitive. Especially if you build one of these plants at a cost of 100's of millions of dollars and then the next 3 years it rains like hell and that DS plant you just built, nobody has a use for.

See? simple.
I remember reading a Russian analytic who stated that removing salt from water is so prohibitive that should the West begin running out of water Russian can effectively monopolize this resource. The only nations that would be able to get away from this are those who would be able to fund a lot of these sort of facilities.
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #31
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Quote:
Most of the world’s 1,500 or so desalination plants use distillation as the process, and there are also flash evaporation and electrodialysis methods. All these methods are very expensive, so historically desalination has only been used where other alternatives are also very expensive, such as desert cities. However, an exploding world demand for potable water has led to a lot of research and development in this field and a new, cheaper process has been developed that involves heating sea water and forcing it through membranes to remove the salt from the water. The process is even cheaper if the desalination plant can be located next to an electrical power plant that is already heating sea water to use for cooling the electrical generating units. Even so, it is still more expensive than other alternatives, but it is indeed becoming more competitive and could become a viable alternative to Edwards water. There is also a lot of interest in using local, brackish groundwaters as a source for desalination instead of ocean water. Such waters typically have only one-tenth the salinity of sea water, so desalination can be accomplished more easily and transportation is less of an issue.

In April 2000 the Texas Water Development Board approved a $59,000 grant to the Lavaca-Navadid River Authority to determine if building a $400 million plant on Matagorda Bay at Point Comfort would be economically and environmentally feasible. There is a power plant at this location that could supply the heated sea water for the membrane process. The study was released two months later and the cost rose to $755 million, but this included the cost of transmission facilities to San Antonio. The study estimated that a 50-50 mix of desalinated water and water treated by other conventional methods could be delivered to San Antonio users for about $2.80 per thousand gallons, compared to a current cost of $1.36 per thousand gallons. A similar plant being constructed in Tampa, Florida will raise customer’s water bills by about $7.50 a month. (1), (2)
http://www.edwardsaquifer.net/desalination.html
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Old February 26th, 2009 #32
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The jews have so fucked up Russia over the past 90 years that there is hardly anyway for the Russians to siege full control of their resources again.

Doesn't anyone remember what the heeb-controlled "Soviet Union" did to the Aral Sea?
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychological shock View Post
I remember reading a Russian analytic who stated that removing salt from water is so prohibitive that should the West begin running out of water Russian can effectively monopolize this resource. The only nations that would be able to get away from this are those who would be able to fund a lot of these sort of facilities.

Last edited by Dale VanderMeer; February 26th, 2009 at 11:29 PM.
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #33
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http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2009/02/25

Cash-Strapped Communities Suffer as Corporations Target Water Systems

New Food & Water Watch Report Reveals that Service Suffers While Costs Skyrocket Under Water Privatization


WASHINGTON - February 25 - A new report released today by Food & Water Watch, a national consumer advocacy group based in Washington, D.C., reveals that many cash-strapped communities across the country are experiencing rate hikes and a decrease in public services after selling their water and wastewater systems to private corporations. Money Down the Drain: How Private Control of Water Wastes Public Resources highlights cities and towns across the country that have sold their water systems to private companies to offset budget deficits in an increasingly unstable economy, and the negative economic and environmental impact of water privatization on those communities.
"Private companies claim that they provide more efficient service and that they can upgrade systems at a lower cost than their public counterparts," said Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch. "Such claims are nothing but spin. Private water companies are beholden to shareholders, not the customers who rely on them for this vital natural resource. The delivery of public water should never be a profit center for privately held corporations."

Highlights of Money Down the Drain: How Private Control of Water Wastes Public Resources include:
  • State-by-state comparisons of public and private water bills that reveal that private companies charge consumers as much as 80 percent more for water and 100 percent more for wastewater services than their public counterparts.
  • How private companies inflate costs, cut corners to profit shareholders and ignore environmentally sustainable practices that might undercut profits.
  • That private water companies target water systems in poor, vulnerable communities with little political capacity to oppose the sale of their water.
  • Case studies of communities in Ohio, Indiana, California, Florida, Pennsylvania and elsewhere that have been negatively impacted by privatization and/or have canceled service contracts with private entities to provide better service to consumers.
  • Food & Water Watch's solutions to local and national water infrastructure challenges, including the need for dedicated federal funding for water and wastewater systems.
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Old February 26th, 2009 #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom McReen View Post
It could be a long summer. Potentially a "summer of rage" as the UK police minion put it.

Be prepared.
Obama in da House + hot weather + water shortage =
 
Old February 26th, 2009 #35
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Aral Sea photos:


All thanks to the "idealism" of a "Soviet" economy.
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Originally Posted by Dale VanderMeer View Post
The jews have so fucked up Russia over the past 90 years that there is hardly anyway for the Russians to siege full control of their resources again.

Doesn't anyone remember what the heb-controlled "Soviet Union" did to the Aral Sea?

Last edited by Dale VanderMeer; February 26th, 2009 at 11:32 PM.
 
Old February 27th, 2009 #36
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Texas Begins Desalinating Sea Water
Posted on: Monday, 2 July 2007

http://www.redorbit.com/news/science...ter/index.html

Quote:
Desalting sea water is expensive,Macro running ....... mostly because of the energy required. Current cost estimates run at about $650 per acre foot (326,000 gallons), as opposed to $200 for purifying the same amount of fresh water.
 
Old February 27th, 2009 #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
Texas Begins Desalinating Sea Water
Posted on: Monday, 2 July 2007

http://www.redorbit.com/news/science...ter/index.html
\

More expensive, yes. If it is all you have, though, it is not such a bad deal.
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Old February 27th, 2009 #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
$650 per acre foot (326,000 gallons), as opposed to $200 for purifying the same amount of fresh water.
The transportation costs must be the main factor. If purifying fresh water results an output of 1630 gallons for every dollar spent, then the price at the store of one dollar a gallon seems like insane gouging.
 
Old February 27th, 2009 #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deathtozog View Post
\

More expensive, yes. If it is all you have, though, it is not such a bad deal.
Yes this is true but my gripe is that if it wasn't for the exploding non-White population none of it would be necessary.

Although San Antonio practically sits on top of the Edwards Aquifer we now have year round drought restrictions & still the local media trumpets on about business, business, business, growth, growth, growth, begging for more people & businesses to move here; its total insanity.


Last edited by Douglas; February 27th, 2009 at 05:31 PM.
 
Old February 27th, 2009 #40
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& what is up with these bullshit tags that have nothing to do with the thread topic.

 
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dog whisperer, environmentalism, irish setter abuse, water

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