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Old April 4th, 2009 #201
Marse Supial
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How about "affect" and "effect"? Those give me fits. I know that AFFECT is generally a verb and EFFECT is generally a noun. But in some instances, EFFECT becomes a verb.

Can anyone succinctly explain it?
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #202
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
How about "affect" and "effect"? Those give me fits. I know that AFFECT is generally a verb and EFFECT is generally a noun. But in some instances, EFFECT becomes a verb.

Can anyone succinctly explain it?

For 'affect' think influence. For effect think cause.

You can effect a change in affect by kicking or kissing. The subject will be affected differently depending on your decision.
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
For 'affect' think influence. For effect think cause.
I know, but see, those concepts, "influence" and "cause" are so closely related: I can influence your thinking about jews. I can cause you to think differently about jews through the influence I have on you.

If I cause you to to think differently about jews, did I affect your thinking or did I have an effect on your thinking. Or both?
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #204
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
I know, but see, those concepts, "influence" and "cause" are so closely related: I can influence your thinking about jews. I can cause you to think differently about jews through the influence I have on you.

If I cause you to to think differently about jews, did I affect your thinking or did I have an effect on your thinking. Or both?
yes, i guess. it's just never given me trouble. for some reason, 'effect' as a verb is bald and powerful to me, like being poked with a finger. 'Uhfect' (affect) is softer, milder, more attitudinal, more like a breeze warming or cooling you. Effect is more like a prod or punch or poke.

I think its easy to see the difference between

affect an outcome

vs

effect an outcome

Like a side dish vs a main course.

Influence vs cause.

Small vs big.
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
I know, but see, those concepts, "influence" and "cause" are so closely related: I can influence your thinking about jews. I can cause you to think differently about jews through the influence I have on you.

If I cause you to to think differently about jews, did I affect your thinking or did I have an effect on your thinking. Or both?
I would say you affected my thinking about jews if you brought up facts I was not aware of, but no fundamental change in my belief about them. But if you turned my view of them from fundamentally positive to negative, then you effected a change in my thinking. In math terms, if I am proceeding left to right, and you turn me more than 90 degrees, you have effected a change. But if you've influenced me less than 90 degrees, you have affected my thinking - influenced but not changed.
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #206
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
But if you turned my view of them from fundamentally positive to negative,
I can't stop laughing long enough to think that through....
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #207
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Oops, I was thinking of Christian Zionists, as an example.
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #208
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Another point:

the cliche is

profound effect

you never hear

profound affect
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #209
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Kind of like on vs in.

In is far stronger.

Somebody, maybe HST, taught me that. Some line like

hair growing on his palm

vs

hair growing in his palm.

B-i-g difference
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #210
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
I would say you affected my thinking about jews if you brought up facts I was not aware of, but no fundamental change in my belief about them. But if you turned my view of them from fundamentally positive to negative, then you effected a change in my thinking. In math terms, if I am proceeding left to right, and you turn me more than 90 degrees, you have effected a change. But if you've influenced me less than 90 degrees, you have affected my thinking - influenced but not changed.

That's as good an explanation as I've heard discussing the verb sense of those two words.

In the noun sense, as I understand it, it's always effect.

Said differently, affect and effect can both be verbs, but only effect can be a noun.

Right?
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #211
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I finally finished reading E. Michael Jones's 1200-page tome on jews. If he had brought me around to his position, he would have effected a profound change in my views. I would join the Catholic church, shutter VNN, and go out among the jews to reclaim them for Christ. But he merely strengthened my views on jews, against his purpose, because I believe he does not know how to interpret his data, since he discards with the cheap smear biological reductivism any notion the jew is any other than a free-willin', free-wheelin' plashtikin' protoplasmic possibilitarian. As opposed to the stinky kike the 2,000 years of history he relates ought to teach him. But on the positive side, from his point of view, he affected my views on Protestants, Catholics and their history with jews by showing me facts and patterns of which I was ignorant.

Last edited by Alex Linder; April 4th, 2009 at 01:23 AM.
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #212
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Quote:

Said differently, affect and effect can both be verbs, but only effect can be a noun.

Right?
Psychology, the field, speaks of affect - essentially a clinical term for feeling or emotion. But for ordinary language I think you're right.
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #213
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Pronounced

aff-ekt, emphasis on first syllable
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #214
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Psychology, the field, speaks of affect - essentially a clinical term for feeling or emotion. But for ordinary language I think you're right.
Yeah, I'll let that one go. I'll probably never use it in that sense.

But thanks for the explanation. I feel like I've got a handle on it now.

And as for changing your views on the jews from fundamentally positive to negative, I haven't laughed that hard in a long time.
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #215
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
Yeah, I'll let that one go. I'll probably never use it in that sense.

But thanks for the explanation. I feel like I've got a handle on it now.

And as for changing your views on the jews from fundamentally positive to negative, I haven't laughed that hard in a long time.
"Affect" is a verb meaning "to act upon, to influence." "Effect" may be either a verb or a noun. As a verb, it means "to bring about" a desired result, "to accomplish." As a noun, it means the "result" (of an action).

As in: This bill will affect the whole country.
It will effect (bring about) an improvement in some industries. [verb]
Its final effects (results) are impossible to predict. [noun]
 
Old April 4th, 2009 #216
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
I finally finished reading E. Michael Jones's 1200-page tome on jews. If he had brought me around to his position, he would have effected a profound change in my views.







..
Gee, Alex, you aren't very staunch in your beliefs, are you old sport?
 
Old April 30th, 2009 #217
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Old June 11th, 2011 #218
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Should the word "Internet" be capitalized?

I've seen it both ways, and want to be correct.
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Old June 11th, 2011 #219
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie in Ohio View Post
Should the word "Internet" be capitalized?

I've seen it both ways, and want to be correct.
I'm not sure even google should always be capitalised except when referring to the company.

You wouldn't capitalise road, airport or expressway.
 
Old October 13th, 2011 #220
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7 Spelling and Grammar Errors that Make You Look Dumb

Don’t let these easy-to-fix spelling and grammar mistakes make you look unprofessional.

By: Leslie Ayres
August 5, 2011


In business, excellence is indeed worth striving for. Make sure all of your communications hold to high standards, because misspellings and bad grammar can hold you back in your career.

Many brilliant people have some communication weak spots. Unfortunately, the reality is that written communication is a big part of business, and how you write reflects on you. Poor spelling and grammar can destroy a professional image in an instant.

Even if your job doesn't require much business writing, you'll still have emails to send and notes to write. And if you're looking for a job, your cover letters and resumes will likely mean the difference between getting the interview or not.

Bad grammar and spelling make a bad impression. Don't let yourself lose an opportunity over a simple spelling or grammar mistake.

Here are seven simple grammatical errors that I see consistently in emails, cover letters and resumes.

Tip: Make yourself a little card cheat sheet and keep it in your wallet for easy reference.

You're / Your

The apostrophe means it's a contraction of two words; "you're" is the short version of "you are" (the "a" is dropped), so if your sentence makes sense if you say "you are," then you're good to use you're. "Your" means it belongs to you, it's yours.
•You're = if you mean "you are" then use the apostrophe
•Your = belonging to you

You're going to love your new job!

It's / Its

This one is confusing, because generally, in addition to being used in contractions, an apostrophe indicates ownership, as in "Dad's new car." But, "it's" is actually the short version of "it is" or "it has." "Its" with no apostrophe means belonging to it.
•It's = it is
•Its = belonging to it

It's important to remember to bring your telephone and its extra battery.

They're / Their / There

"They're" is a contraction of "they are." "Their" means belonging to them. "There" refers to a place (notice that the word "here" is part of it, which is also a place – so if it says here and there, it's a place). There = a place
•They're = they are
•Their = belonging to them

They're going to miss their teachers when they leave there.

Loose / Lose

These spellings really don't make much sense, so you just have to remember them. "Loose" is the opposite of tight, and rhymes with goose. "Lose" is the opposite of win, and rhymes with booze. (To show how unpredictable English is, compare another pair of words, "choose" and "chose," which are spelled the same except the initial sound, but pronounced differently. No wonder so many people get it wrong!)
•Loose = it's not tight, it's loosey goosey
•Lose= "don't lose the hose for the rose" is a way to remember the same spelling but a different pronunciation

I never thought I could lose so much weight; now my pants are all loose!

Lead / Led

Another common but glaring error. "Lead" means you're doing it in the present, and rhymes with deed. "Led" is the past tense of lead, and rhymes with sled. So you can "lead" your current organization, but you "led" the people in your previous job.
•Lead = present tense, rhymes with deed
•Led = past tense, rhymes with sled

My goal is to lead this team to success, just as I led my past teams into winning award after award.

A lot / Alot / Allot

First the bad news: there is no such word as "alot." "A lot" refers to quantity, and "allot" means to distribute or parcel out.

There is a lot of confusion about this one, so I'm going to allot ten minutes to review these rules of grammar.

Between you and I

This one is widely misused, even by TV news anchors who should know better.

In English, we use a different pronoun depending on whether it's the subject or the object of the sentence: I/me, she/her, he/him, they/them. This becomes second nature for us and we rarely make mistakes with the glaring exception of when we have to choose between "you and I" or "you and me."

Grammar Girl does a far better job of explaining this than I, but suffice to say that "between you and I" is never correct, and although it is becoming more common, it's kind of like saying "him did a great job." It is glaringly incorrect.

The easy rule of thumb is to replace the "you and I" or "you and me" with either "we" or "us" and you'll quickly see which form is right. If "us" works, then use "you and me" and if "we" works, then use "you and I."

Between you and me (us), here are the secrets to how you and I (we) can learn to write better.

Master these common errors and you'll remove some of the mistakes and red flags that make you look like you have no idea how to speak.

http://work.lifegoesstrong.com/7-spe...bref=obnetwork
 
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